Manuka is one of the youngest entries in the book of aromatherapy, as its uses in aromatherapy are discovered quite recently. But its medicinal uses were known since long among the original inhabitants of New Zealand, to which this tree is a native. The health benefits of Manuka Essential Oil can be attributed to its properties like anti dandruff, antidote to insect bites and stings, anti bacterial, anti fungal, anti inflammatory, anti histaminic, anti allergenic. cicatrisant, etc.

Manuka is one of the youngest entries in the book of aromatherapy, as its uses in aromatherapy are discovered quite recently. But its medicinal uses were known since long among the original inhabitants of New Zealand, to which this tree is a native. The health benefits of Manuka Essential Oil can be attributed to its properties like anti dandruff, antidote to insect bites and stings, anti bacterial, anti fungal, anti inflammatory, anti histaminic, anti allergenic. cicatrisant, etc.

A favorite vegetable called "Kopakopa" used primarily as a first aid remedy. Like most plants and shrubs, Maori always found a way to fully utilize the products of nature for food, health, healing and protection. Our task today is to remember which ones did what, why and how.

A favorite vegetable called "Kopakopa" used primarily as a first aid remedy. Like most plants and shrubs, Maori always found a way to fully utilize the products of nature for food, health, healing and protection. Our task today is to remember which ones did what, why and how.

The Maori chef Eru Tutaki, at Treetops Lodge in the New Zealand's North Island’s Horohoro Forest, fashions a new cuisine from foraged produce.

New Zealand's Otherworldly Landscapes

The Maori chef Eru Tutaki, at Treetops Lodge in the New Zealand's North Island’s Horohoro Forest, fashions a new cuisine from foraged produce.

Koromiko Tender leaves were bruised and applied as a poultice for ulcers and veneral disease. Wet branches were thrown on a fire with whau and karamū, to make a steam bath treatment for broken bones.

Koromiko Tender leaves were bruised and applied as a poultice for ulcers and veneral disease. Wet branches were thrown on a fire with whau and karamū, to make a steam bath treatment for broken bones.

Pikopiko cooked to perfection exactly how I like it, dripping with "wai kutae", mussel stock. With aroma's similar to asparagus scented with a strong New Zealand native forest flavour, this native vegetable is prized at a high level in the kitchens of the Marae and home. Now marketed as a fiddlehead vegetable in restaurants across New Zealand, it has earnt its rightful place amongst our mainstream vegetables. ka pai tera.

Pikopiko cooked to perfection exactly how I like it, dripping with "wai kutae", mussel stock. With aroma's similar to asparagus scented with a strong New Zealand native forest flavour, this native vegetable is prized at a high level in the kitchens of the Marae and home. Now marketed as a fiddlehead vegetable in restaurants across New Zealand, it has earnt its rightful place amongst our mainstream vegetables. ka pai tera.

Rātā The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion. A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses. The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery. Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Rātā The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion. A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses. The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery. Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Rātā The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion. A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses. The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery. Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Rātā The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion. A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses. The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery. Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

A new favorite perennial food plant - New Zealand Spinach - Kokihi - #Maara #Kai #Maori

A new favorite perennial food plant - New Zealand Spinach - Kokihi - #Maara #Kai #Maori

Akeake, Dodonea viscosa Meaning ‘forever and ever’ indicating the strength of the wood, which is very resistant and historically used to make clubs and spears. Rongoa made from the leaves and bark is good for indigestion, gout and rheumatism. It is also used on wounds as a healant, reducing swelling and good for burns and scalds.

Akeake, Dodonea viscosa Meaning ‘forever and ever’ indicating the strength of the wood, which is very resistant and historically used to make clubs and spears. Rongoa made from the leaves and bark is good for indigestion, gout and rheumatism. It is also used on wounds as a healant, reducing swelling and good for burns and scalds.


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Rimu    The inner bark of the rimu tree was beaten into pulp and put on burnt skin.  The pulped bark was combined with water and hot stones in a calabash, and dabbed on ulcers or running sores.  The bark of the young tree was used to stop wounds bleeding.

Rimu The inner bark of the rimu tree was beaten into pulp and put on burnt skin. The pulped bark was combined with water and hot stones in a calabash, and dabbed on ulcers or running sores. The bark of the young tree was used to stop wounds bleeding.

Kaipara Lemon  Unique NZ heirloom Lemon, also known as the Maori Lemon, has masses of medium sized knobbly sub-acidic fruit which can be eaten skin & all.

Kaipara Lemon Unique NZ heirloom Lemon, also known as the Maori Lemon, has masses of medium sized knobbly sub-acidic fruit which can be eaten skin & all.

Kōwhai    The bark of the kōwhai tree was heated in a calabash with hot stones, and made into a poultice for wounds or to rub on a sore back.  A person bitten in the face by a seal had wai kōwhai (kōwhai juice) applied to their wounds, and was well within days.

Kōwhai The bark of the kōwhai tree was heated in a calabash with hot stones, and made into a poultice for wounds or to rub on a sore back. A person bitten in the face by a seal had wai kōwhai (kōwhai juice) applied to their wounds, and was well within days.

We wash our rongoa that we have collected from the bush and start preparing it to be used for the right dishes - here we have kiokio, kawakawa, ngaio, mahoe and rangiora

We wash our rongoa that we have collected from the bush and start preparing it to be used for the right dishes - here we have kiokio, kawakawa, ngaio, mahoe and rangiora

New Zealand spinach keeps on growing and seems to be unaffected by the bugs and problems that affect other greens. This is a very robust plant that even can handle saline soils, drought, bugs, salt and poor soil. And it does much better in heat than true spinach.

New Zealand spinach keeps on growing and seems to be unaffected by the bugs and problems that affect other greens. This is a very robust plant that even can handle saline soils, drought, bugs, salt and poor soil. And it does much better in heat than true spinach.

Rātā    The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion.  A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses.  The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery.  Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Rātā The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion. A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses. The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery. Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Rātā    The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion.  A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses.  The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery.  Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Rātā The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion. A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses. The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery. Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Puawananga our beautiful native clematis.

Puawananga our beautiful native clematis.

Mānuka    Ashes of mānuka were rubbed on the scalp to cure dandruff.  Mānuka branches were used to splint broken limbs.  Leaves were put in a calabash with water and hot stones, and the liquid was drunk to ease a fever.  The bark was boiled in water, which was drunk to cure dysentery and diarrhoea.

Mānuka Ashes of mānuka were rubbed on the scalp to cure dandruff. Mānuka branches were used to splint broken limbs. Leaves were put in a calabash with water and hot stones, and the liquid was drunk to ease a fever. The bark was boiled in water, which was drunk to cure dysentery and diarrhoea.

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