Christina Gregg - "The jury found Christina Gregg guilty of wilful murder. She was arrested and committed for trial. Edmund Langstreth, although not charged, was also detained. At the Supreme Court trial in Christchurch on 5–6 December 1859, Christina Gregg pleaded not guilty to the charge of murdering her husband. The jury retired for 30 minutes and returned a verdict of not guilty. Despite the notoriety of 'The Riccarton Poisoning Case', Christina Gregg continued to live on the farm.."

Christina Gregg - "The jury found Christina Gregg guilty of wilful murder. She was arrested and committed for trial. Edmund Langstreth, although not charged, was also detained. At the Supreme Court trial in Christchurch on 5–6 December 1859, Christina Gregg pleaded not guilty to the charge of murdering her husband. The jury retired for 30 minutes and returned a verdict of not guilty. Despite the notoriety of 'The Riccarton Poisoning Case', Christina Gregg continued to live on the farm.."

William George Garrard - "In 1887 the city council appointed Garrard Auckland's first dog ranger, probably in an attempt to undermine his political activities. He became a familiar figure on the city's streets as he bustled along equipped with a short whip-handle, at the end of which were several pieces of clothesline tied with slip-knots. Despite steady employment, Garrard continued to attract controversy. In 1889 he faced a petition from his neighbours to remove him from his home."

William George Garrard - "In 1887 the city council appointed Garrard Auckland's first dog ranger, probably in an attempt to undermine his political activities. He became a familiar figure on the city's streets as he bustled along equipped with a short whip-handle, at the end of which were several pieces of clothesline tied with slip-knots. Despite steady employment, Garrard continued to attract controversy. In 1889 he faced a petition from his neighbours to remove him from his home."

Lionel Terry - "Terry tried to convince members of the House of Representatives and immigration officials that all non-European immigration should be stopped. He had little success, and in an effort to gain further publicity for his views he shot Joe Kum Yung on the night of 24 September 1905. The victim was rushed to hospital but died soon after. Terry surrendered to the police the following morning, handing over his revolver and a copy of The shadow, which he said would explain his…

Lionel Terry - "Terry tried to convince members of the House of Representatives and immigration officials that all non-European immigration should be stopped. He had little success, and in an effort to gain further publicity for his views he shot Joe Kum Yung on the night of 24 September 1905. The victim was rushed to hospital but died soon after. Terry surrendered to the police the following morning, handing over his revolver and a copy of The shadow, which he said would explain his…

James Teer - "On 3 May 1866 Teer left Melbourne to sail to London via Cape Horn on the General Grant. On board were 83 people and a cargo which included about £10,000 worth of gold. On 14 May the ship, off course and becalmed, was washed into a cavern on the west side of Auckland Island where it sank. Teer was among the 15 survivors and, in spite of the presence of a ship's officer, he immediately emerged as leader."

James Teer - "On 3 May 1866 Teer left Melbourne to sail to London via Cape Horn on the General Grant. On board were 83 people and a cargo which included about £10,000 worth of gold. On 14 May the ship, off course and becalmed, was washed into a cavern on the west side of Auckland Island where it sank. Teer was among the 15 survivors and, in spite of the presence of a ship's officer, he immediately emerged as leader."

Alice Woodhouse - "In the early 1940s some friends persuaded her to enter a recently introduced radio quiz programme, ‘Information Please’, on station 2ZB, Wellington. She won £1 and discovered that she had both a taste and a facility for answering general knowledge questions. When the radio ‘King of Quiz’ series was inaugurated in 1944, she won six weekly contests to qualify for the title ‘Queen of Quiz’, an honour that was to bring her nationwide prominence.."

Alice Woodhouse - "In the early 1940s some friends persuaded her to enter a recently introduced radio quiz programme, ‘Information Please’, on station 2ZB, Wellington. She won £1 and discovered that she had both a taste and a facility for answering general knowledge questions. When the radio ‘King of Quiz’ series was inaugurated in 1944, she won six weekly contests to qualify for the title ‘Queen of Quiz’, an honour that was to bring her nationwide prominence.."

Josip Petrov Babich - "Babich was once prosecuted for selling two bottles of wine to a customer, when the law required a minimum sale of two gallons. When the police witness's evidence proved inconsistent, the case was dismissed, but Babich's lawyer, H. H. Ostler, urged his client to 'get away from this place. There's no future for a winemaker up here'."

Josip Petrov Babich - "Babich was once prosecuted for selling two bottles of wine to a customer, when the law required a minimum sale of two gallons. When the police witness's evidence proved inconsistent, the case was dismissed, but Babich's lawyer, H. H. Ostler, urged his client to 'get away from this place. There's no future for a winemaker up here'."

Charlotte Badger - "According to one, she dressed in male clothing and, armed with a pistol, flogged the captain and conducted a raid on another vessel to obtain supplies and weapons. In another she and Catherine Hagerty are said to have incited the male convicts to rebel."

Charlotte Badger - "According to one, she dressed in male clothing and, armed with a pistol, flogged the captain and conducted a raid on another vessel to obtain supplies and weapons. In another she and Catherine Hagerty are said to have incited the male convicts to rebel."

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