Laura Badinski
More ideas from Laura
As Richard G. Scott has suggested, “each of us needs to periodically check our bearings and confirm that we are on course.” We all could benefit from asking questions like: •Is there anything I know I should not be doing? If so, I will repent and stop it now. •Is there anything I know I should be doing, but am not? If so, I will start on it today. •What am I currently doing in life that I know is right and good? These are the practices and habits I will continue to develop.

As Richard G. Scott has suggested, “each of us needs to periodically check our bearings and confirm that we are on course.” We all could benefit from asking questions like: •Is there anything I know I should not be doing? If so, I will repent and stop it now. •Is there anything I know I should be doing, but am not? If so, I will start on it today. •What am I currently doing in life that I know is right and good? These are the practices and habits I will continue to develop.

I've been through a tremendous amount of pain and change in the last few years, but there's still a part of my heart that isn't ready to give up.

I've been through a tremendous amount of pain and change in the last few years, but there's still a part of my heart that isn't ready to give up.

"Traveling isn't something you're good at. It's something you do. Like breathing." www.tomislavperko.com

"Traveling isn't something you're good at. It's something you do. Like breathing." www.tomislavperko.com

"Sometimes it's like someone took a knife baby Edgy and dull and cut a six-inch valley." -Shakey Graves More

Making the enso—the Zen circle that conveys everything, the whole world, complete, the ultimate Zen symbol of emptiness—is kind of a practice. Ensos are traditionally done in sumi ink, black on white, but Kazuaki Tanahashi is well known for his colorful ones, which he makes with one brushstroke.

Making the enso—the Zen circle that conveys everything, the whole world, complete, the ultimate Zen symbol of emptiness—is kind of a practice. Ensos are traditionally done in sumi ink, black on white, but Kazuaki Tanahashi is well known for his colorful ones, which he makes with one brushstroke.

noornalini: Enso, ‘Miracles of Each Moment’ by Kazuaki Tanahashi “In the Zen tradition ensos, or circle symbols, have been drawn with black ink on paper, to represent enlightenment. As the multi-colored flow of paint represents the interconnectedness of all life, each circle reflects my hopes, visions and aspirations for a world making a healthier choices for the benefit of future generations.” –Kaz

noornalini: Enso, ‘Miracles of Each Moment’ by Kazuaki Tanahashi “In the Zen tradition ensos, or circle symbols, have been drawn with black ink on paper, to represent enlightenment. As the multi-colored flow of paint represents the interconnectedness of all life, each circle reflects my hopes, visions and aspirations for a world making a healthier choices for the benefit of future generations.” –Kaz