The third test at Eden Park, Auckland on September 12th 1981, is remembered for the flares and flour bombs dropped onto the pitch from a light plane. Outside the ground, violence erupted on an unprecedented scale.

The third test at Eden Park, Auckland on September 12th 1981, is remembered for the flares and flour bombs dropped onto the pitch from a light plane. Outside the ground, violence erupted on an unprecedented scale.

This image shows the police running out onto the field after anti-tour protestors broke through and managed to occupy the field, eventually leading to the cancellation of this match.

This image shows the police running out onto the field after anti-tour protestors broke through and managed to occupy the field, eventually leading to the cancellation of this match.

This cartoon depicts how Muldoon may have used the tour to gain political advantage by professing his beliefs in the separation of sports and politics.

This cartoon depicts how Muldoon may have used the tour to gain political advantage by professing his beliefs in the separation of sports and politics.

Opinions on the tour throughout the cities in NZ. Rural  pro-tour, they just wanted to watch rugby, urban they were anti-tour and disliked apartheid

Opinions on the tour throughout the cities in NZ. Rural pro-tour, they just wanted to watch rugby, urban they were anti-tour and disliked apartheid

The Gleneagles agreement was signed by the commonwealth government and this was to discourage sporting contact with South Africa. However with the tour NZ's repuation was ruined.

The Gleneagles agreement was signed by the commonwealth government and this was to discourage sporting contact with South Africa. However with the tour NZ's repuation was ruined.

To cover the cost of the Tour (protection etc) the government used the citizens tax to fund all this.

To cover the cost of the Tour (protection etc) the government used the citizens tax to fund all this.

Prime Minister (Muldoon) believed the National Party could gain political advantage by letting 'merit-based' mixed race South Africans play in NZ when rural polls shows pro-tour

Prime Minister (Muldoon) believed the National Party could gain political advantage by letting 'merit-based' mixed race South Africans play in NZ when rural polls shows pro-tour

Apartheid was a policy of racial segregation built upon the idea of white supremacy, first enforced in South Africa in 1948 and was one of the main reason anti-tour protestors were so against letting the Springbok team at the time tour here. While most countries had  cut sporting ties with South Africa because of this policy, NZ had not and continued to play sport against South Africa. Many feared that by allowing the tour to proceed, NZ would come across as supporters of apartheid.

Apartheid was a policy of racial segregation built upon the idea of white supremacy, first enforced in South Africa in 1948 and was one of the main reason anti-tour protestors were so against letting the Springbok team at the time tour here. While most countries had cut sporting ties with South Africa because of this policy, NZ had not and continued to play sport against South Africa. Many feared that by allowing the tour to proceed, NZ would come across as supporters of apartheid.

Robert Muldoon served as the 31st Prime Minister of NZ,  a prominent member of the National Party. He professed a belief in that politics should have no interference in the business of sports. Due to the racially segregrating policy of apartheid held in South Africa at the time, he refused to give in to pressure from the public to call the tour off. Many felt that by extending this invitation to the Springboks, NZ would be globally seen as condoning apartheid.

Robert Muldoon served as the 31st Prime Minister of NZ, a prominent member of the National Party. He professed a belief in that politics should have no interference in the business of sports. Due to the racially segregrating policy of apartheid held in South Africa at the time, he refused to give in to pressure from the public to call the tour off. Many felt that by extending this invitation to the Springboks, NZ would be globally seen as condoning apartheid.

Shows how police and protestors had Beef between them and this continued in the courts long after the tour ended.

Shows how police and protestors had Beef between them and this continued in the courts long after the tour ended.

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