Types of tukutuku designs – Māori weaving and tukutuku – te raranga me te whatu – Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand

Types of tukutuku designs – Māori weaving and tukutuku – te raranga me te whatu – Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand

The simplest canoes were dugouts, made by hollowing out a log. Other canoes can be made by joining planks together and waterproofing them. They made sails by weaving together coconut or pine leaves. For longer trips, they used large double-hulled canoes. They had large ones that were 30m long and could carry up to 300 people. To travel futher, large canoes could carry less people and more supplies.

The simplest canoes were dugouts, made by hollowing out a log. Other canoes can be made by joining planks together and waterproofing them. They made sails by weaving together coconut or pine leaves. For longer trips, they used large double-hulled canoes. They had large ones that were 30m long and could carry up to 300 people. To travel futher, large canoes could carry less people and more supplies.

Maori traditional Wharenui (ritual big house) - New Zealand

Maori traditional Wharenui (ritual big house) - New Zealand

Waka (Maori canoe)

Waka (Maori canoe)

Whitikaupeka  Wharenui,  Moawhango, New Zealand

Whitikaupeka Wharenui, Moawhango, New Zealand

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