Koromiko    Tender leaves were bruised and applied as a poultice for ulcers and veneral disease.  Wet branches were thrown on a fire with whau and karamū, to make a steam bath treatment for broken bones.

Koromiko Tender leaves were bruised and applied as a poultice for ulcers and veneral disease. Wet branches were thrown on a fire with whau and karamū, to make a steam bath treatment for broken bones.

Kōwhai    The bark of the kōwhai tree was heated in a calabash with hot stones, and made into a poultice for wounds or to rub on a sore back.  A person bitten in the face by a seal had wai kōwhai (kōwhai juice) applied to their wounds, and was well within days.

Kōwhai The bark of the kōwhai tree was heated in a calabash with hot stones, and made into a poultice for wounds or to rub on a sore back. A person bitten in the face by a seal had wai kōwhai (kōwhai juice) applied to their wounds, and was well within days.

Kūmarahou is still used as a herbal treatment today.  medicine was made by boiling the leaves in water for drinking, which was said to ease rheumatism and asthma. It is a blood purifier ,  coughs and flu was also used for tuberculosis  .

Kūmarahou is still used as a herbal treatment today. medicine was made by boiling the leaves in water for drinking, which was said to ease rheumatism and asthma. It is a blood purifier , coughs and flu was also used for tuberculosis .

Horopito. Parts used: Leaves.The Horopito plant is most well known for its action against candida. The active constituent of horopito is polygoidal which makes the “hot taste” in peppery spices, producing significant anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties. It has been shown to inhibit the growth of candida albicans and other yeast-like fungi.  Externally useful for fungal infections, such as candida albicans and ringworm, wounds cuts and burns. Horopito stimulates the circulation of the…

Horopito. Parts used: Leaves.The Horopito plant is most well known for its action against candida. The active constituent of horopito is polygoidal which makes the “hot taste” in peppery spices, producing significant anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties. It has been shown to inhibit the growth of candida albicans and other yeast-like fungi. Externally useful for fungal infections, such as candida albicans and ringworm, wounds cuts and burns. Horopito stimulates the circulation of the…

Rimu    The inner bark of the rimu tree was beaten into pulp and put on burnt skin.  The pulped bark was combined with water and hot stones in a calabash, and dabbed on ulcers or running sores.  The bark of the young tree was used to stop wounds bleeding. (NZ)

Rimu The inner bark of the rimu tree was beaten into pulp and put on burnt skin. The pulped bark was combined with water and hot stones in a calabash, and dabbed on ulcers or running sores. The bark of the young tree was used to stop wounds bleeding. (NZ)

Mapou, or Red Matipo (Myrsine australis) A hardy tree, resistant to wind. Easily grown from seed. Wavy edged leaves, small red blotches, red stems. Maori medicinal plant, leaves boiled to ease toothache. Inconspicuous flowers, small black fruit on female trees in summer. Attracts birds.

Mapou, or Red Matipo (Myrsine australis) A hardy tree, resistant to wind. Easily grown from seed. Wavy edged leaves, small red blotches, red stems. Maori medicinal plant, leaves boiled to ease toothache. Inconspicuous flowers, small black fruit on female trees in summer. Attracts birds.

Mānuka    Ashes of mānuka were rubbed on the scalp to cure dandruff.  Mānuka branches were used to splint broken limbs.  Leaves were put in a calabash with water and hot stones, and the liquid was drunk to ease a fever.  The bark was boiled in water, which was drunk to cure dysentery and diarrhoea.

Mānuka Ashes of mānuka were rubbed on the scalp to cure dandruff. Mānuka branches were used to splint broken limbs. Leaves were put in a calabash with water and hot stones, and the liquid was drunk to ease a fever. The bark was boiled in water, which was drunk to cure dysentery and diarrhoea.

Rātā    The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion.  A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses.  The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery.  Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Rātā The bark of the rātā tree was soaked in water, which was then applied as a lotion. A poultice of bark was put on sores, wounds and abscesses. The inner bark was steeped in water and drunk for diarrhoea and dysentery. Rātā nectar, collected by tapping the flowers against the inside of a calabash, was taken to cure a sore throat.

Harakeke New Zealand Flax . This plant is found throughout New Zealand,  The seed is currently used for oil as it is rich in linoleic acid, an ‘essential’ fatty acid. Early recordings identify a wide range of uses for harakeke, from healing burns to constipation to gunshot and bayonet wounds.The roots are noted as being used for colds and headaches whereas the leaves are used for stomach trouble. The liquid gained from boiling the roots is apparently a good substitute for castor oil.

Harakeke New Zealand Flax . This plant is found throughout New Zealand, The seed is currently used for oil as it is rich in linoleic acid, an ‘essential’ fatty acid. Early recordings identify a wide range of uses for harakeke, from healing burns to constipation to gunshot and bayonet wounds.The roots are noted as being used for colds and headaches whereas the leaves are used for stomach trouble. The liquid gained from boiling the roots is apparently a good substitute for castor oil.

Kanuka and Manuka,, Manuka is abundant throughout New Zealand . Captain Cook used this plant to make tea, as he liked the bitter taste, hence its other common name of tea-tree. An infusion of the bark is used externally and internally as a sedative. It was also used for scalds and burns. The ash from the bark was rubbed onto the skin to treat skin diseases. Vapour from leaves boiled in water was used for colds. The inner bark was boiled and the liquid used as a mouthwash.

Kanuka and Manuka,, Manuka is abundant throughout New Zealand . Captain Cook used this plant to make tea, as he liked the bitter taste, hence its other common name of tea-tree. An infusion of the bark is used externally and internally as a sedative. It was also used for scalds and burns. The ash from the bark was rubbed onto the skin to treat skin diseases. Vapour from leaves boiled in water was used for colds. The inner bark was boiled and the liquid used as a mouthwash.

Pinterest
Search