Woman in Iran:  Two fashionably dressed women in Shiraz

Woman in Iran: Two fashionably dressed women in Shiraz

Iranian women are using Fashion in protest to wearing hijabs by force . Allowing the wind to blow through your hair is an offence punishable by law for women in Iran. The inhuman Islamic law is enforced pretty heavily and many woman are arrested or fined by police if they fail to cover up with the attire considered appropriate. But brave ladies are rebelling against the law which they feel is outdated and unfair.

Iranian women are using Fashion in protest to wearing hijabs by force . Allowing the wind to blow through your hair is an offence punishable by law for women in Iran. The inhuman Islamic law is enforced pretty heavily and many woman are arrested or fined by police if they fail to cover up with the attire considered appropriate. But brave ladies are rebelling against the law which they feel is outdated and unfair.

Iranian women are using Fashion in protest to wearing hijabs by force . Allowing the wind to blow through your hair is an offence punishable by law for women in Iran. The inhuman Islamic law is enforced pretty heavily and many woman are arrested or fined by police if they fail to cover up with the attire considered appropriate. But brave ladies are rebelling against the law which they feel is outdated and unfair.

Iranian women are using Fashion in protest to wearing hijabs by force . Allowing the wind to blow through your hair is an offence punishable by law for women in Iran. The inhuman Islamic law is enforced pretty heavily and many woman are arrested or fined by police if they fail to cover up with the attire considered appropriate. But brave ladies are rebelling against the law which they feel is outdated and unfair.

Reconstruction of the face of a woman buried 5,000 years ago in the "Burnt City" in Iran.

Reconstruction of the face of a woman buried 5,000 years ago in the "Burnt City" in Iran.

Iranian women are using Fashion in protest to wearing hijabs by force . Allowing the wind to blow through your hair is an offence punishable by law for women in Iran. The inhuman Islamic law is enforced pretty heavily and many woman are arrested or fined by police if they fail to cover up with the attire considered appropriate. But brave ladies are rebelling against the law which they feel is outdated and unfair.

Iranian women are using Fashion in protest to wearing hijabs by force . Allowing the wind to blow through your hair is an offence punishable by law for women in Iran. The inhuman Islamic law is enforced pretty heavily and many woman are arrested or fined by police if they fail to cover up with the attire considered appropriate. But brave ladies are rebelling against the law which they feel is outdated and unfair.

Tehran style. These girls can DRESS.

These Stylish Iranian Women Won't Let A Dress Code Hold Them Back

Iranian women are using Fashion in protest to wearing hijabs by force . Allowing the wind to blow through your hair is an offence punishable by law for women in Iran. The inhuman Islamic law is enforced pretty heavily and many woman are arrested or fined by police if they fail to cover up with the attire considered appropriate. But brave ladies are rebelling against the law which they feel is outdated and unfair.

Iranian women are using Fashion in protest to wearing hijabs by force . Allowing the wind to blow through your hair is an offence punishable by law for women in Iran. The inhuman Islamic law is enforced pretty heavily and many woman are arrested or fined by police if they fail to cover up with the attire considered appropriate. But brave ladies are rebelling against the law which they feel is outdated and unfair.

Enslaved Black Woman in Iran, 1714  People from Eastern Africa were brought to Khuzistan in southwestern Iran to work in sugarcane plantations.  Females were employed as wet nurses and nannies. Many also served as concubines; under Islamic law their own children, called khanazad (house-born), became members of the slaveholder's family.

Enslaved Black Woman in Iran, 1714 People from Eastern Africa were brought to Khuzistan in southwestern Iran to work in sugarcane plantations. Females were employed as wet nurses and nannies. Many also served as concubines; under Islamic law their own children, called khanazad (house-born), became members of the slaveholder's family.

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