Triton (moon) - Wikipedia

Triton (moon) - Wikipedia

Triton, largest moon of Neptune, taken from the Voyager 2 spacecraft. It is one of only three objects in the solar system with a nitrogen-dominated atmosphere - the other two being Earth and Saturn's giant moon Titan. It also has the coldest surface known in the solar system at -391 degrees Fahrenheit. At that temp, nitrogen condenses as frost.

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Triton, largest moon of Neptune, taken from the Voyager 2 spacecraft. It is one of only three objects in the solar system with a nitrogen-dominated atmosphere - the other two being Earth and Saturn's giant moon Titan. It also has the coldest surface known in the solar system at -391 degrees Fahrenheit. At that temp, nitrogen condenses as frost.

Triton is, with a diameter of 2,700 km, the largest of Neptune’s 13 moons. It is the only large moon in the Solar System with a retrograde orbit (an orbit in the opposite direction to its planet’s rotation), which cannot have formed out of the same region as Neptune, so it must have been captured from elsewhere. Because of its retrograde orbit and composition similar to Pluto’s, Triton is thought to have been captured from the Kuiper belt.

Triton is, with a diameter of 2,700 km, the largest of Neptune’s 13 moons. It is the only large moon in the Solar System with a retrograde orbit (an orbit in the opposite direction to its planet’s rotation), which cannot have formed out of the same region as Neptune, so it must have been captured from elsewhere. Because of its retrograde orbit and composition similar to Pluto’s, Triton is thought to have been captured from the Kuiper belt.

Triton's tortured surface, as seen by Voyager 2 in 1989. (Image credit:

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Dark streaks along the southern pole of Triton, Neptune's largest moon. They are thought to be caused by the eruption of nitrogen geysers.

Dark streaks along the southern pole of Triton, Neptune's largest moon. They are thought to be caused by the eruption of nitrogen geysers.

This image of the south polar terrain of Triton, (Neptune's Moon) taken on Aug. 25, 1989 reveals about 50 dark plumes or 'wind streaks' on the icy nitrogen surface.

This image of the south polar terrain of Triton, (Neptune's Moon) taken on Aug. 25, 1989 reveals about 50 dark plumes or 'wind streaks' on the icy nitrogen surface.

Dark streaks on Triton (moon of Neptune) formed by deposits from ice or cryovolcanos. Credit: NASA

Dark streaks on Triton (moon of Neptune) formed by deposits from ice or cryovolcanos. Credit: NASA

Triton, moon of Neptune, observed by the Voyager 2 space probe on August 24, 1989. (NASA)

Triton, moon of Neptune, observed by the Voyager 2 space probe on August 24, 1989. (NASA)

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