The Falling Soldier - Federico Correll Garcia, shot by Robert Capa, Spanish Civil War, 1936.

The Falling Soldier - Federico Correll Garcia, shot by Robert Capa, Spanish Civil War, 1936.

The Falling Soldier Robert Capa  (American (born Hungary), Budapest 1913–1954 Thai Binh) Date: 1936 Medium: Gelatin silver print Dimensions: Image: 24.7 x 34 cm (9 3/4 x 13 3/8 in.) Classification: Photographs Credit Line: Gilman Collection, Purchase, Alfred Stieglitz Society Gifts, 2005 Accession Number: 2005.100.166 Rights and Reproduction: Photograph by Robert Capa © Cornell Capa / Magnum

The Falling Soldier Robert Capa (American (born Hungary), Budapest 1913–1954 Thai Binh) Date: 1936 Medium: Gelatin silver print Dimensions: Image: 24.7 x 34 cm (9 3/4 x 13 3/8 in.) Classification: Photographs Credit Line: Gilman Collection, Purchase, Alfred Stieglitz Society Gifts, 2005 Accession Number: 2005.100.166 Rights and Reproduction: Photograph by Robert Capa © Cornell Capa / Magnum

The Falling Soldier Artist: Robert Capa (American (born Hungary), Budapest 1913–1954 Thai Binh) Date: 1936, printed later Medium: Gelatin silver print

The Falling Soldier Artist: Robert Capa (American (born Hungary), Budapest 1913–1954 Thai Binh) Date: 1936, printed later Medium: Gelatin silver print

They had to call him the autumn soldier instead of the "fall" soldier so he wouldn't remember falling from that train.

They had to call him the autumn soldier instead of the "fall" soldier so he wouldn't remember falling from that train.

the falling soldier(part of full sleeve) falling soldier spanish civil war  http://www.bluedogtattoo.co.uk/portfolio-items/the-falling- . . .

the falling soldier(part of full sleeve) falling soldier spanish civil war http://www.bluedogtattoo.co.uk/portfolio-items/the-falling- . . .

LegoLenta. The Falling Soldier is a famous photograph taken by Robert Capa. It was understood to have been taken on September 5, 1936, and was long thought to depict the death of a Republican, specifically an Iberian Federation of Libertarian Youth (FIJL) soldier during the Spanish Civil War. He was later identified as the anarchist militiaman Federico Borrell García. The full title of the photograph is Loyalist Militiaman at the Moment of Death, Cerro Muriano, September 5, 1936.

LegoLenta. The Falling Soldier is a famous photograph taken by Robert Capa. It was understood to have been taken on September 5, 1936, and was long thought to depict the death of a Republican, specifically an Iberian Federation of Libertarian Youth (FIJL) soldier during the Spanish Civil War. He was later identified as the anarchist militiaman Federico Borrell García. The full title of the photograph is Loyalist Militiaman at the Moment of Death, Cerro Muriano, September 5, 1936.

The Halloween Hermit — call-me-winter-soldier:  Halloween at Hogwarts...

The Halloween Hermit — call-me-winter-soldier: Halloween at Hogwarts...

do you remember that ONE time i was LONGING for you.. it must have been about NINE years ago now in BENIGN during HOMECOMING we were in that RUSTED old FREIGHT CAR and you described DAYBREAK as a FURNACE that was burning up the sky....<<< Art

do you remember that ONE time i was LONGING for you.. it must have been about NINE years ago now in BENIGN during HOMECOMING we were in that RUSTED old FREIGHT CAR and you described DAYBREAK as a FURNACE that was burning up the sky....<<< Art

Pinning this because it's cute and also because Bruce's shirt has a flower on it :))

Pinning this because it's cute and also because Bruce's shirt has a flower on it :))

Robert Capa - Spanish civil War - (The Falling Soldier) Cerro Muriano, Cordoba front, Spain. September 5th, 1936

Robert Capa - Spanish civil War - (The Falling Soldier) Cerro Muriano, Cordoba front, Spain. September 5th, 1936

Photographer behind 9/11 "Falling Man" retraces steps, recalls "unknown soldier"

Photographer behind 9/11 "Falling Man" retraces steps, recalls "unknown soldier"

Photographer behind "Falling Man" retraces steps, recalls "unknown soldier"

When The Falling Soldier was published in the July 12, 1937, issue of Life magazine, the caption stated, “Robert Capa’s camera catches a Spanish soldier the instant he is dropped by a bullet through the head in front of Córdoba.” Over the following years and decades, during and after Capa’s death, the photograph was widely published without any questions ever being raised about its reliability as an unposed document.

Robert Capa

When The Falling Soldier was published in the July 12, 1937, issue of Life magazine, the caption stated, “Robert Capa’s camera catches a Spanish soldier the instant he is dropped by a bullet through the head in front of Córdoba.” Over the following years and decades, during and after Capa’s death, the photograph was widely published without any questions ever being raised about its reliability as an unposed document.

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