The Syriac alphabet developed from the Aramaic alphabet and was used mainly to write the Syriac language from about the 2nd century BC. There are a number of different forms of the Syriac alphabet: Esṭrangelā (ܐܣܛܪܢܓܠܐ), Serṭā (ܣܪܛܐ) and Madnḥāyā (ܡܕܢܚܝܐ). (...)

The Syriac alphabet developed from the Aramaic alphabet and was used mainly to write the Syriac language from about the 2nd century BC. There are a number of different forms of the Syriac alphabet: Esṭrangelā (ܐܣܛܪܢܓܠܐ), Serṭā (ܣܪܛܐ) and Madnḥāyā (ܡܕܢܚܝܐ). (...)

Ephrem the Syrian was a Syriac deacon and a prolific Syriac-language hymnographer and theologian of the 4th century from the region of Syria. His works are hailed by Christians throughout the world, and many denominations venerate him as a saint. He has been declared a Doctor of the Church in Roman Catholicism. He is especially beloved in the Syriac Orthodox Church. He has been called the most significant of all of the fathers of the Syriac-speaking church tradition.

Ephrem the Syrian was a Syriac deacon and a prolific Syriac-language hymnographer and theologian of the 4th century from the region of Syria. His works are hailed by Christians throughout the world, and many denominations venerate him as a saint. He has been declared a Doctor of the Church in Roman Catholicism. He is especially beloved in the Syriac Orthodox Church. He has been called the most significant of all of the fathers of the Syriac-speaking church tradition.

Syriac language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Syriac language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Modern Aramaic (Assyrian/Syriac)/ English-Modern Aramaic: Dictionary and Phrasebook by Nicholas Awde, Nineb Limassu, and Nicholas Al-Jeloo

Modern Aramaic (Assyrian/Syriac)/ English-Modern Aramaic: Dictionary and Phrasebook by Nicholas Awde, Nineb Limassu, and Nicholas Al-Jeloo

My grandmother was fluent in Assyrian (Neo-Aramaic). I'm only a quarter Assyrian, but I'd love to learn the language someday.

My grandmother was fluent in Assyrian (Neo-Aramaic). I'm only a quarter Assyrian, but I'd love to learn the language someday.

Aramaic (ארמית, Arāmît): The Aramaic alphabet was adaptaed from the Phoenician alphabet during the 8th century BC and was used to write the Aramaic language until about 600 AD. The Aramaic alphabet was adapted to write quite a few other languages, and developed into a number of new alphabets, including the Hebrew square script and cursive script, Nabataean, Syriac, Palmyrenean, Mandaic, Sogdian, Mongolian and probably the Old Turkic script. (...)

Aramaic (ארמית, Arāmît): The Aramaic alphabet was adaptaed from the Phoenician alphabet during the 8th century BC and was used to write the Aramaic language until about 600 AD. The Aramaic alphabet was adapted to write quite a few other languages, and developed into a number of new alphabets, including the Hebrew square script and cursive script, Nabataean, Syriac, Palmyrenean, Mandaic, Sogdian, Mongolian and probably the Old Turkic script. (...)

ARAMAIC  The Aramaic language was the international trade language of the ancient Middle East between 1000 and 600 BCE, spoken from the Mediterranean coast to the borders of India. Its script, derived from Phoenician and first attested during the 9th century BCE, also became extremely popular and was adopted by many people with or without any previous writing system

ARAMAIC The Aramaic language was the international trade language of the ancient Middle East between 1000 and 600 BCE, spoken from the Mediterranean coast to the borders of India. Its script, derived from Phoenician and first attested during the 9th century BCE, also became extremely popular and was adopted by many people with or without any previous writing system

Syriac language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Syriac language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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