Kwame Ture (born Stokely Carmichael; June 29, 1941 – November 15, 1998) was a Trinidadian-American black activist active in the 1960s American Civil Rights Movement. He rose to prominence first as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) later as the "Honorary Prime Minister" of the Black Panther Party. Initially an integrationist, Carmichael later became affiliated with black nationalist and Pan-Africanist movements.  He popularized the term "Black Power".

Kwame Ture (born Stokely Carmichael; June 29, 1941 – November 15, 1998) was a Trinidadian-American black activist active in the 1960s American Civil Rights Movement. He rose to prominence first as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) later as the "Honorary Prime Minister" of the Black Panther Party. Initially an integrationist, Carmichael later became affiliated with black nationalist and Pan-Africanist movements. He popularized the term "Black Power".

Fannie Lou Hamer was born today in 1917. She was an organizer of Mississippi Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and then went to the 1964 Democratic National Convention as the Vice-Chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, demanding to be seated. Her uncompromising, plain-spoken advocacy embarrassed Hubert Humphrey and enraged President Johnson. She was seated as a member of Mississippi's official delegation to the Democratic National Convention of…

Fannie Lou Hamer was born today in 1917. She was an organizer of Mississippi Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and then went to the 1964 Democratic National Convention as the Vice-Chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, demanding to be seated. Her uncompromising, plain-spoken advocacy embarrassed Hubert Humphrey and enraged President Johnson. She was seated as a member of Mississippi's official delegation to the Democratic National Convention of…

Diane Nash - A leader & strategist of the student wing of the Civil Rights Movement, Diane Nash was a member of the Freedom Riders. She also helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) & the Selma Voting Rights Committee campaign, which helped blacks in the South to vote & have political power. A bright, focused, utterly fearless woman, with an unerring instinct for the correct tactical move at each increment of the crisis; a leader, with flawless instincts.

7 Of The Most Unrecognized Women in Black History

Diane Nash - A leader & strategist of the student wing of the Civil Rights Movement, Diane Nash was a member of the Freedom Riders. She also helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) & the Selma Voting Rights Committee campaign, which helped blacks in the South to vote & have political power. A bright, focused, utterly fearless woman, with an unerring instinct for the correct tactical move at each increment of the crisis; a leader, with flawless instincts.

Fannie Lou Hamer was instrumental in organizing Mississippi Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and later became the Vice-Chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, attending the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in that capacity. Her plain-spoken manner and fervent belief in the Biblical righteousness of her cause gained her a reputation as an electrifying speaker and constant activist of civil rights.

Fannie Lou Hamer was instrumental in organizing Mississippi Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and later became the Vice-Chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, attending the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, New Jersey, in that capacity. Her plain-spoken manner and fervent belief in the Biblical righteousness of her cause gained her a reputation as an electrifying speaker and constant activist of civil rights.

James Forman was an American Civil Rights leader active in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the Black Panther Party, and the International Black Workers Congress Forman was born on October 4, 1928, in Chicago, Illinois. As an 11-month-old baby, he was sent to live with his grandmother…James Forman was an American Civil Rights leader active in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the Black Panther Party, and the International Black Workers Congress Forman was born on…

James Forman was an American Civil Rights leader active in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the Black Panther Party, and the International Black Workers Congress Forman was born on October 4, 1928, in Chicago, Illinois. As an 11-month-old baby, he was sent to live with his grandmother…James Forman was an American Civil Rights leader active in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the Black Panther Party, and the International Black Workers Congress Forman was born on…

H. Rap Brown, SNCC [i.e., Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee], news conf[erence]. Photo by Marion S. Trikosko, July 27, 1967.  U.S. News & World Report Magazine Photograph Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

H. Rap Brown, SNCC [i.e., Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee], news conf[erence]. Photo by Marion S. Trikosko, July 27, 1967. U.S. News & World Report Magazine Photograph Collection, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.

Frank Smith, Jr., a civil rights activist and politician in Washington, D.C., is most recognized as the first person associated with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to be sent Mississippi to register voters. Smith was born in Newnan, Georgia, on September 17, 1942. He attended M...Frank Smith, Jr., a civil rights activist and politician in Washington, D.C., is most recognized as the first person associated with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to be…

Frank Smith, Jr., a civil rights activist and politician in Washington, D.C., is most recognized as the first person associated with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to be sent Mississippi to register voters. Smith was born in Newnan, Georgia, on September 17, 1942. He attended M...Frank Smith, Jr., a civil rights activist and politician in Washington, D.C., is most recognized as the first person associated with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to be…

John Lewis, a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee who had planned to call the civil rights bill "too little, too late" at the 1963 March on Washington, shown on April 16, 1964. Photo by Marion S. Trikosko, U.S. News and World Report.

John Lewis, a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee who had planned to call the civil rights bill "too little, too late" at the 1963 March on Washington, shown on April 16, 1964. Photo by Marion S. Trikosko, U.S. News and World Report.

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