Wooden State of South Carolina with by CampgroundProduction // yeahTHATgreenville

Wooden State of South Carolina with Palmetto Tree

February 12, 1946 – African American United States Army veteran Isaac Woodard is severely beaten by a South Carolina police officer to the point where he loses his vision in both eyes. The incident galvanizes the Civil Rights Movement and partially inspires Orson Welles' film Touch of Evil.

February 12, 1946 – African American United States Army veteran Isaac Woodard is severely beaten by a South Carolina police officer to the point where he loses his vision in both eyes. The incident galvanizes the Civil Rights Movement and partially inspires Orson Welles' film Touch of Evil.

Isaac Woodard Jr., African American World War 2 veteran decorated for courage under fire during service in the Pacific, is beaten by South Carolina police until he’s blind. He was declined the use of a toilet in South Carolina.  PHOTO: Joe Louis and Neil Scott help Isaac Woodard up a set a stairs soon after a beating left him blind. - See more at: http://historynewsnetwork.org/article/162274#sthash.dY03qw1H.dpuf

Isaac Woodard Jr., African American World War 2 veteran decorated for courage under fire during service in the Pacific, is beaten by South Carolina police until he’s blind. He was declined the use of a toilet in South Carolina. PHOTO: Joe Louis and Neil Scott help Isaac Woodard up a set a stairs soon after a beating left him blind. - See more at: http://historynewsnetwork.org/article/162274#sthash.dY03qw1H.dpuf

"Plantation Police. Runaway Slave Patrol. 1858" Slave patrols were organized groups of 3 to 6 white men who enforced discipline upon black slaves during the antebellum U.S. southern states. They policed the slaves on the plantations and hunted down fugitive slaves. Patrols used summary punishment against escapees, which included maiming or killing them. Beginning in 1704 in South Carolina, slave patrols were established and the idea spread throughout the southern states. — in South Carolina.

"Plantation Police. Runaway Slave Patrol. 1858" Slave patrols were organized groups of 3 to 6 white men who enforced discipline upon black slaves during the antebellum U.S. southern states. They policed the slaves on the plantations and hunted down fugitive slaves. Patrols used summary punishment against escapees, which included maiming or killing them. Beginning in 1704 in South Carolina, slave patrols were established and the idea spread throughout the southern states. — in South Carolina.

South Carolina police shooting: Dash cam video released - CNN.com

South Carolina police shooting: Dash cam video released - CNN.com

There are some things that police academy training can prepare you for, but several South Carolina police officers learned the hard way that there are also some things that no amount of training can mentally prepare you for. Police officers were called out to the home of Savanah Victoria Morgan, a mother who was eight month…

There are some things that police academy training can prepare you for, but several South Carolina police officers learned the hard way that there are also some things that no amount of training can mentally prepare you for. Police officers were called out to the home of Savanah Victoria Morgan, a mother who was eight month…

Hampton neighborhood, Columbia, South Carolina - Columbia, South Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hampton neighborhood, Columbia, South Carolina - Columbia, South Carolina - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The sister of a South Carolina man who was killed by police after a high-speed car chase claims in a lawsuit that three officers shot her brother 17 times in the back.

South Carolina man killed by police was shot 17 times In back: lawsuit

The sister of a South Carolina man who was killed by police after a high-speed car chase claims in a lawsuit that three officers shot her brother 17 times in the back.

Three African American students Samuel Ephesians Hammond Jr., 18, Delano Herman Middleton, 17 and Henry Ezekial Smith, 18 were killed by police on February 8, 1968. They were students at one of America's Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) South Carolina State University. Referred to as the Orangeburg Massacre. South Carolina Highway Patrol officers shot and killed protesters on campus on the evening of February 8, 1968.

Three African American students Samuel Ephesians Hammond Jr., 18, Delano Herman Middleton, 17 and Henry Ezekial Smith, 18 were killed by police on February 8, 1968. They were students at one of America's Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) South Carolina State University. Referred to as the Orangeburg Massacre. South Carolina Highway Patrol officers shot and killed protesters on campus on the evening of February 8, 1968.

South Carolina Man Killed by Police Was Shot 17 Times in Back: Lawsuit - NBC News

South Carolina man killed by police was shot 17 times In back: lawsuit

South Carolina Man Killed by Police Was Shot 17 Times in Back: Lawsuit - NBC News

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