On This Day in History, July 19, 1848: The first ever U.S. woman’s rights convention was held in Seneca Falls, NY with almost 200 women in attendance.

On This Day in History, July The first ever U. woman’s rights convention was held in Seneca Falls, NY with almost 200 women in attendance.

A two-day convention that was attended by almost 300 people (men and women), focused on this petition, the Declaration of Sentiments. This petition detailed the oppression men had imposed on women. Women wanted, and had been deprived, of legal rights, of the legal right to own their own property, of custody of their children in cases of divorce, of the right of higher education, etc… (1848)

Declaration of Sentiments of the Seneca Falls Convention – 1848 (women suffrage) primary source document w/ reading questions

Stanton wrote the Declaration of Sentiments, which was similar to the Declaration of Independence. It talked of equal rights for men and women. She was able to receive signatures for the Declaration of Sentiments at the Seneca Falls Convention.

Talk about a spirited pair of sisters: Lucretia Mott and Martha Coffin Wright helped organize the Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls in 1848 after they were refused seats at the male-dominated International Anti-Slavery Convention in 1840. The convention was pivotal in initiating the movement for women's suffrage.

Talk about a spirited pair of sisters: Lucretia Mott and Martha Coffin Wright helped organize the Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls in 1848 after they were refused seats at the male-dominated International Anti-Slavery Convention in 1840. The convention was pivotal in initiating the movement for women's suffrage.

The Seneca Falls Convention was the first women’s rights convention in American history. In July of 1848, hundreds of women gathered in Seneca Falls, NY to kick off the convention, which eventually led to the Suffrage Movement. It began, with Elizabeth Cady Stanton reading through the Declaration of Sentiments for all the attendees to deliberate.

This Day in Resistance History: Declaration of Sentiments at Women’s Rights Convention, Seneca Falls 1848

Is there possibly a better argument than reason 12: "IT IS FOR THE COMMON GOOD OF ALL"? 👩🏿🗳👩🏾🗳👩🏽🗳👩🏼🗳👩🏻 ...

Is there possibly a better argument than reason 12: "IT IS FOR THE COMMON GOOD OF ALL"? 👩🏿🗳👩🏾🗳👩🏽🗳👩🏼🗳👩🏻 ...

Haudenosaunee Women, Women’s March.       It is no coincidence that the women’s rights movement had its first meeting at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848. Non-Native women who lead the women’s rights movement then, like Elizabeth Cody Stanton and Lucretia Mott, were heavily influenced by the power Haudenosaunee women held. It made them realize that they did not have to accept subservient roles to men.

Haudenosaunee Women, Women’s March. It is no coincidence that the women’s rights movement had its first meeting at the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848. Non-Native women who lead the women’s rights movement then, like Elizabeth Cody Stanton and Lucretia Mott, were heavily influenced by the power Haudenosaunee women held. It made them realize that they did not have to accept subservient roles to men.

Seneca Falls Convention - YouTube

The Seneca Falls Convention was the start

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. Photo credit: Library of Congress

2 Days, 300 Participants: The Seneca Falls Convention: Image of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, seated, and Susan B. They were both important leaders in the fight for womens suffrage.

Seneca Falls Convention took place in 1848 and was the 1st convention to discuss woman's rights. It was organized by Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Seneca Falls Convention took place in 1848 and was the convention to discuss woman's rights. It was organized by Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

First Women's Rights Convention

First Women's Rights Convention

Declaration of Sentiments — Women's Rights, National Historical Park, New York — at the National Park Service web site.

Women’s Rights National Historical Park tells the story of the first Women’s Rights Convention held in Seneca Falls, NY on July

Lucretia Coffin Mott in 1842 (1793–1880) was an American Quaker, abolitionist, social reformer, and proponent of women’s rights. She is said to be one of the first American feminists in the early 19th century

Lucretia Coffin Mott in 1842 was an American Quaker, abolitionist, social reformer, and proponent of women’s rights. She is said to be one of the first American feminists in the early century

Revolutionary Backlash: Women and Politics in the Early American Republic (Early American Studies)

Revolutionary Backlash: Women and Politics in the Early American Republic (Early American Studies)

Pinterest
Search