Tunic of Lieutenant-Colonel E.C.L. Durnford, Royal Marine Artillery. The tunic is of blue wool and has a standup collar of buckram faced with red wool and edged with gold lace.  There is a silver threadwork badge of an exploding grenade on either side of the collar which is for Artillery. Both shoulders have plaited gold shoulder straps with rank badges. The tunic is single-breasted and closes with eight gilt brass buttons with Royal Marines Artillery insignia.

Tunic of Lieutenant-Colonel E.C.L. Durnford, Royal Marine Artillery. The tunic is of blue wool and has a standup collar of buckram faced with red wool and edged with gold lace. There is a silver threadwork badge of an exploding grenade on either side of the collar which is for Artillery. Both shoulders have plaited gold shoulder straps with rank badges. The tunic is single-breasted and closes with eight gilt brass buttons with Royal Marines Artillery insignia.

Royal Marines dress coat, England, 1782, brass, linen, metal thread, wool.  Worn by Major General Arthur Tooker Collins (1718-93). Constructed of red wool with cuffs & lapels faced with blue. The buttonholes are of embroidered metal thread & the cast brass buttons are stamped with a laurel wreath enclosing a crossed sword & baton. The skirts could be turned back, so the white lining of the coat created a contrast against the red wool of the skirts, and secured by means of hook and eye…

Royal Marines dress coat, England, 1782, brass, linen, metal thread, wool. Worn by Major General Arthur Tooker Collins (1718-93). Constructed of red wool with cuffs & lapels faced with blue. The buttonholes are of embroidered metal thread & the cast brass buttons are stamped with a laurel wreath enclosing a crossed sword & baton. The skirts could be turned back, so the white lining of the coat created a contrast against the red wool of the skirts, and secured by means of hook and eye…

Royal Marine Statue outside the Royal Marine Museum in Southsea - he is shown yomping the phrase made famous during the Falklands War in 1982 when the Royal Marines walked across the Falklands and into battle.

Royal Marine Statue outside the Royal Marine Museum in Southsea - he is shown yomping the phrase made famous during the Falklands War in 1982 when the Royal Marines walked across the Falklands and into battle.

THE FALKLANDS, 1982 — From the Imperial War Museum: “An exhausted Royal Marine of 45 Royal Marine Commando with his SLR rifle and 140lb pack rests at Port Stanley after completing a remarkable 40 mile march across the Island. The route from the west coast to the east took the Royal Marines through marshes and mountains, included night time marching and was at that time the longest march in full kit in the history of the Commando force.”  (Imperial War Museum)

THE FALKLANDS, 1982 — From the Imperial War Museum: “An exhausted Royal Marine of 45 Royal Marine Commando with his SLR rifle and 140lb pack rests at Port Stanley after completing a remarkable 40 mile march across the Island. The route from the west coast to the east took the Royal Marines through marshes and mountains, included night time marching and was at that time the longest march in full kit in the history of the Commando force.” (Imperial War Museum)

James Northcote RA. -  Lt George Dyer of the Marines, 1780.    Dyer was commissioned into the Marines at the age of 18 in 1776 and finally retired as Second Colonel Commandant in 1816. A highlight of his career was the Battle of the Glorious First of June in 1794, in which he fought as Captain of Marines on board HMS Orion. However he began to suffer from severe sea sickness & after 1800 he was allowed to spend the remainder of his career ashore, much of it in recruiting.  Royal Marines…

James Northcote RA. - Lt George Dyer of the Marines, 1780. Dyer was commissioned into the Marines at the age of 18 in 1776 and finally retired as Second Colonel Commandant in 1816. A highlight of his career was the Battle of the Glorious First of June in 1794, in which he fought as Captain of Marines on board HMS Orion. However he began to suffer from severe sea sickness & after 1800 he was allowed to spend the remainder of his career ashore, much of it in recruiting. Royal Marines…

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