How Roman rule crumbled in Britain.

21 Maps That Will Change How You Think About Britain

Mosaics of Roman Britain: Sea-horse, Fishbourne Roman Palace, Sussex.  Sea-horses and sea-panthers surround the central medallion of a cupid astride a dolphin.

Mosaics of Roman Britain: Sea-horse, Fishbourne Roman Palace, Sussex. Sea-horses and sea-panthers surround the central medallion of a cupid astride a dolphin.

Wroxeter is the site of an old Roman town, Viroconium Cornoviorum, which was the fourth largest  capital in Roman Britain. Established in 48AD and growing to a fair size before being abandoned sometime on the 5th or 6th century AD. Wroxeter has the largest intact section of Roman wall in the UK

Wroxeter is the site of an old Roman town, Viroconium Cornoviorum, which was the fourth largest capital in Roman Britain. Established in 48AD and growing to a fair size before being abandoned sometime on the 5th or 6th century AD. Wroxeter has the largest intact section of Roman wall in the UK

Mosaics of Roman Britain: Venus. Bignor Roman Villa, Sussex. This mosaic, recognised as one of the finest in Britain, is usually identified as Venus, although it may have been the head of a mere mortal, perhaps based on the lady of the house. The image is flanked by long-tailed birds and winged cupids dressed as gladiators.

Mosaics of Roman Britain: Venus. Bignor Roman Villa, Sussex. This mosaic, recognised as one of the finest in Britain, is usually identified as Venus, although it may have been the head of a mere mortal, perhaps based on the lady of the house. The image is flanked by long-tailed birds and winged cupids dressed as gladiators.

The Juliana Bracelet from the Hoxne hoard Roman Britain, buried in the 5th century AD Found in Hoxne, Suffolk (1992)

The Juliana Bracelet from the Hoxne hoard Roman Britain, buried in the 5th century AD Found in Hoxne, Suffolk (1992)

Roman roads, together with Roman aqueducts and the vast standing Roman army, constituted the three most impressive features of the Roman Empire. In Britain, as in their other provinces, the Romans constructed a comprehensive network of paved trunk roads (i.e. surfaced highways) during their nearly four centuries of occupation (43 - 410 AD).

Roman roads, together with Roman aqueducts and the vast standing Roman army, constituted the three most impressive features of the Roman Empire. In Britain, as in their other provinces, the Romans constructed a comprehensive network of paved trunk roads (i.e. surfaced highways) during their nearly four centuries of occupation (43 - 410 AD).

While Julius Cæsar was conquering Gaul, he learned that to the West of it lay an island named Britain, whose tribes were mainly of tile same race with the Gauls, and gave them help in their struggle against the Romans.  He resolved, therefore, to invade Britain (55 B.C.).

While Julius Cæsar was conquering Gaul, he learned that to the West of it lay an island named Britain, whose tribes were mainly of tile same race with the Gauls, and gave them help in their struggle against the Romans. He resolved, therefore, to invade Britain (55 B.C.).

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