The retroperitoneal space (retroperitoneum) is the anatomical space (sometimes a potential space) in the abdominal cavity behind (retro) the peritoneum. Description from imgarcade.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

The retroperitoneal space (retroperitoneum) is the anatomical space (sometimes a potential space) in the abdominal cavity behind (retro) the peritoneum. Description from imgarcade.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Drawing of the anatomy of the retroperitoneal spaces at the level of the kidneys. The anterior pararenal space (APRS) is located between the parietal peritoneum (PP) and the anterior renal fascia (ARF) and contains the pancreas (Pan), the ascending colon (AC), and the descending colon (DC). The posterior pararenal space (PPRS) is located between the posterior renal fascia (PRF) and the transversalis fascia (TF). The perirenal space (PRS) is located between the anterior renal fascia and the…

Drawing of the anatomy of the retroperitoneal spaces at the level of the kidneys. The anterior pararenal space (APRS) is located between the parietal peritoneum (PP) and the anterior renal fascia (ARF) and contains the pancreas (Pan), the ascending colon (AC), and the descending colon (DC). The posterior pararenal space (PPRS) is located between the posterior renal fascia (PRF) and the transversalis fascia (TF). The perirenal space (PRS) is located between the anterior renal fascia and the…

The retroperitoneum is the part of the abdominal cavity that lies between the posterior parietal peritoneum and anterior to the transversalis fascia.  It is divided into three spaces by the perirenal fascia and is best visualised using CT or MRI. The three spaces are:  anterior pararenal space perirenal space posterior pararenal space  http://radiopaedia.org/articles/retroperitoneum

The retroperitoneum is the part of the abdominal cavity that lies between the posterior parietal peritoneum and anterior to the transversalis fascia. It is divided into three spaces by the perirenal fascia and is best visualised using CT or MRI. The three spaces are: anterior pararenal space perirenal space posterior pararenal space http://radiopaedia.org/articles/retroperitoneum

Pneumoretroperitoneum - presence of gas within the retroperitoneal space. Typically the air outlines structures like the kidneys, psoas muscles and retroperitoneal portions of the bowel (duodenum, ascending colon, descending colon and rectum). It is almost always due to perforation of a hollow retroperitoneal viscus such as may occur in duodenal ulcer disease, abdominal trauma, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis, colorectal cancer and following endoscopy.

Pneumoretroperitoneum - presence of gas within the retroperitoneal space. Typically the air outlines structures like the kidneys, psoas muscles and retroperitoneal portions of the bowel (duodenum, ascending colon, descending colon and rectum). It is almost always due to perforation of a hollow retroperitoneal viscus such as may occur in duodenal ulcer disease, abdominal trauma, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis, colorectal cancer and following endoscopy.

The kidney is one of the most important organs in our body. It is typically a two-shaped organ, located at the rear of the abdominal cavity in the retroperitoneal space. The Kidney's are typically between 8-12 cm long .

The kidney is one of the most important organs in our body. It is typically a two-shaped organ, located at the rear of the abdominal cavity in the retroperitoneal space. The Kidney's are typically between 8-12 cm long .

Psoas muscle abscess and fluid collections are located in the retrofascial space rather than in the retroperitoneal space because the psoas muscles are located posterior to the transversalis fascia, which is the posterior boundary of the retroperitoneum.  Ultrasonography is diagnostic in only 60% of cases of psoas abscess, compared with 80% to 100% for CT.   Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/psoas-muscle-abscess

Psoas muscle abscess and fluid collections are located in the retrofascial space rather than in the retroperitoneal space because the psoas muscles are located posterior to the transversalis fascia, which is the posterior boundary of the retroperitoneum. Ultrasonography is diagnostic in only 60% of cases of psoas abscess, compared with 80% to 100% for CT. Read more: http://radiopaedia.org/articles/psoas-muscle-abscess

Figure 2 Identification and incision of the white line of Toldt and mobilization of the colon and access to the retroperitoneal space (arrow).

Figure 2 Identification and incision of the white line of Toldt and mobilization of the colon and access to the retroperitoneal space (arrow).

Radiology Essentials 105 : Sectional Anatomy of Retroperitoneal Spaces  Boundaries of retroperitoneal space:   Anterior – posterior parietal peritoneum, Posterior – transversalis fascia, Superior – diaphragmatic fascia, Inferior – pelvic brim Major compartments: Anterior pararenal space, Posterior pararenal space, Perirenal space – the largest of all 3 compartments.

Radiology Essentials 105 : Sectional Anatomy of Retroperitoneal Spaces Boundaries of retroperitoneal space: Anterior – posterior parietal peritoneum, Posterior – transversalis fascia, Superior – diaphragmatic fascia, Inferior – pelvic brim Major compartments: Anterior pararenal space, Posterior pararenal space, Perirenal space – the largest of all 3 compartments.

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