Quark Star Plays Role in New Theory for Brightest Supernovae

Quark Star Plays Role in New Theory for Brightest Supernovae

The sizes of a neutron star and a quark star compared to the Grand Canyon. The smallest, most massive, most compressed neutron star possible is about 17 kilometers in diameter. A quark star can be smaller than 11 kilometers diameter. The canyon is 29 kilometers from rim to rim. In reality this scene couldn't exist; the entire Earth would collapse almost instantly to a thin layer coating the surface of either superdense star. Illustration by D. Berry / Chandra X-ray Center.

The sizes of a neutron star and a quark star compared to the Grand Canyon. The smallest, most massive, most compressed neutron star possible is about 17 kilometers in diameter. A quark star can be smaller than 11 kilometers diameter. The canyon is 29 kilometers from rim to rim. In reality this scene couldn't exist; the entire Earth would collapse almost instantly to a thin layer coating the surface of either superdense star. Illustration by D. Berry / Chandra X-ray Center.

Two elements hint Cas A underwent a quark nova — a theoretical explosion that leaves behind a quark star — just days after the original supernova.

Two elements hint Cas A underwent a quark nova — a theoretical explosion that leaves behind a quark star — just days after the original supernova.

Are double-humped super-luminous supernovae happening when a neutron star converts to a quark star?

Are double-humped super-luminous supernovae happening when a neutron star converts to a quark star?

Stephen Hawking: The Higgs Boson Could Destroy the Universe Any Minute Now

Neutron stars tend to lie in the range of 1.4 to 2 solar masses. Any star with a neutron star’s density that’s over 10 solar masses has to become a black hole. That leaves a bit of a gap, although there is evidence of stellar black holes down to only 3 solar masses. The theoretical gap for strange stars to form may only be in the 2 to 3 solar masses range.

Neutron stars tend to lie in the range of 1.4 to 2 solar masses. Any star with a neutron star’s density that’s over 10 solar masses has to become a black hole. That leaves a bit of a gap, although there is evidence of stellar black holes down to only 3 solar masses. The theoretical gap for strange stars to form may only be in the 2 to 3 solar masses range.

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