Pyroclastic Flows on Ischia | #Geology #GeologyPage  Locality: Poseidon's Gardens near Citara on the island of Ischia Italy  Photo Copyright  Drew Patrick Fox Lane High School/EPOD  Geology Page www.geologypage.com

Pyroclastic Flows on Ischia | #Geology #GeologyPage Locality: Poseidon's Gardens near Citara on the island of Ischia Italy Photo Copyright Drew Patrick Fox Lane High School/EPOD Geology Page www.geologypage.com

The dome of Unzen, Japan Volcano collapsed and created a pyroclastic flow in '91. The people here escaped when the flow stopped before reaching them, but the deadly and terrible speed of it, is astonishing.  Pyroclastic flows are fluidized masses of rock fragments and gases that move rapidly in response to gravity. They  can form in several different ways, such as when an eruption column collapses, as the result of gravitational collapse or from an explosion on a lava dome.

The dome of Unzen, Japan Volcano collapsed and created a pyroclastic flow in '91. The people here escaped when the flow stopped before reaching them, but the deadly and terrible speed of it, is astonishing. Pyroclastic flows are fluidized masses of rock fragments and gases that move rapidly in response to gravity. They can form in several different ways, such as when an eruption column collapses, as the result of gravitational collapse or from an explosion on a lava dome.

A pickup truck flees from the pyroclastic flows spewing from the Mt.Pinatubo volcano in the Philippines, on June 17, 1991. This was the second largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century

A pickup truck flees from the pyroclastic flows spewing from the Mt.Pinatubo volcano in the Philippines, on June 17, 1991. This was the second largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century

Pyroclastic flows at Mayon Volcano - They are a fast-moving current of hot gas and rock (collectively known as tephra), which reaches speeds moving away from a volcano of up to 700 km/h (450 mph).[2] The gas can reach temperatures of about 1,000 °C (1,830 °F). Pyroclastic flows normally hug the ground and travel downhill, or spread laterally under gravity. Their speed depends upon the density of the current, the volcanic output rate, and the gradient of the slope. They are a common and…

Pyroclastic flows at Mayon Volcano - They are a fast-moving current of hot gas and rock (collectively known as tephra), which reaches speeds moving away from a volcano of up to 700 km/h (450 mph).[2] The gas can reach temperatures of about 1,000 °C (1,830 °F). Pyroclastic flows normally hug the ground and travel downhill, or spread laterally under gravity. Their speed depends upon the density of the current, the volcanic output rate, and the gradient of the slope. They are a common and…

Pyroclastic flow will destroy nearly everything in its path. With rock fragments ranging in size from ash to boulders traveling across the ground at speeds greater than 80 km per hour, pyroclastic flows knock down, shatter, bury or carry away nearly all objects and structures in their way. The extreme temperatures of rocks and gas inside pyroclastic flows, between 200°C and 700°C, can cause combustible material to burn, especially petroleum products, wood, vegetation, and houses. -- Samuel…

Pyroclastic flow will destroy nearly everything in its path. With rock fragments ranging in size from ash to boulders traveling across the ground at speeds greater than 80 km per hour, pyroclastic flows knock down, shatter, bury or carry away nearly all objects and structures in their way. The extreme temperatures of rocks and gas inside pyroclastic flows, between 200°C and 700°C, can cause combustible material to burn, especially petroleum products, wood, vegetation, and houses. -- Samuel…

Herculaneum/ Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town destroyed by volcanic pyroclastic flows AD 79, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano, in the Italian region of Campania in the shadow of Mt. Vesuvius.   It is most famous for having been lost, along with Pompeii, Stabiae and Oplontis, in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius beginning on August 24, AD 79,

Herculaneum/ Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town destroyed by volcanic pyroclastic flows AD 79, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano, in the Italian region of Campania in the shadow of Mt. Vesuvius. It is most famous for having been lost, along with Pompeii, Stabiae and Oplontis, in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius beginning on August 24, AD 79,

Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town destroyed by volcanic pyroclastic flows AD 79, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano, in the Italian region of Campania in the shadow of Mt. Vesuvius.  It is most famous for having been lost, along with Pompeii, Stabiae and Oplontis, in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius beginning on August 24, AD 79, which buried them in superheated pyroclastic material that has solidified into volcanic tuff. It also…

Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town destroyed by volcanic pyroclastic flows AD 79, located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano, in the Italian region of Campania in the shadow of Mt. Vesuvius. It is most famous for having been lost, along with Pompeii, Stabiae and Oplontis, in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius beginning on August 24, AD 79, which buried them in superheated pyroclastic material that has solidified into volcanic tuff. It also…

2010.10.29 - Mount Merapi releases a pyroclastic flow during eruption as seen from Deles, Central Java, Indonesia. There have been no new reports of injuries or damage. (AP Photo)

2010.10.29 - Mount Merapi releases a pyroclastic flow during eruption as seen from Deles, Central Java, Indonesia. There have been no new reports of injuries or damage. (AP Photo)

A Roman house in Herculaneum. Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town destroyed by volcanic pyroclastic flows in 79 A.D., located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano, in the Italian region of Campania in the shadow of Mt. Vesuvius.

A Roman house in Herculaneum. Herculaneum (in modern Italian Ercolano) was an ancient Roman town destroyed by volcanic pyroclastic flows in 79 A.D., located in the territory of the current commune of Ercolano, in the Italian region of Campania in the shadow of Mt. Vesuvius.

On June 17, 1991, Mount Pinutabo in the Philippines, erupted. It released massive quantities of pyroclastic flow, which is seen behind the truck in this image. Pyroclastic flow can move at speeds exceeding 600 mph.

On June 17, 1991, Mount Pinutabo in the Philippines, erupted. It released massive quantities of pyroclastic flow, which is seen behind the truck in this image. Pyroclastic flow can move at speeds exceeding 600 mph.

Must go faster!  Volcanic pyroclastic flow, a fast-moving current of superheated gas (which can reach temperatures of about 1,000 °C (1,830 °F)) and rock (collectively known as tephra), which reaches speeds moving away from a volcano of up to 700 km/h (450 mph).

Must go faster! Volcanic pyroclastic flow, a fast-moving current of superheated gas (which can reach temperatures of about 1,000 °C (1,830 °F)) and rock (collectively known as tephra), which reaches speeds moving away from a volcano of up to 700 km/h (450 mph).

Terrifying Pyroclastic Flows Sinabung Volcano Eruption in 4K Ultra HD  Published on Jan 24, 2014 Terrifying Pyroclastic Flows Sinabung Volcano Eruption in 4K Ultra HD. For licensing please email James (at) EarthUncut (dot) TV Shot at Sinabung volcano, Indonesia on 21st January 2014. No unauthorised ripping or commercial use. 火砕流

Terrifying Pyroclastic Flows Sinabung Volcano Eruption in 4K Ultra HD Published on Jan 24, 2014 Terrifying Pyroclastic Flows Sinabung Volcano Eruption in 4K Ultra HD. For licensing please email James (at) EarthUncut (dot) TV Shot at Sinabung volcano, Indonesia on 21st January 2014. No unauthorised ripping or commercial use. 火砕流

Pyroclastic flow deposits covering the old city of Plymouth on the Caribbean island of Montserrat

Pyroclastic flow deposits covering the old city of Plymouth on the Caribbean island of Montserrat

A pyroclastic flow rushes down the side of Mount St. Helens on August 7, 1980. (USGS photo)

Mount St. Helens, 30 years ago

A pyroclastic flow rushes down the side of Mount St. Helens on August 7, 1980. (USGS photo)

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