The theme of the Perseus myth is Heroism. Greek heroes tend to share uncommon strength, immense bravery, and noble morality. They also depend upon a certain degree of clever ingenuity to achieve success. Perseus presented himself as brave and courage for trudging forward to one of the gorgon's, Medusa. He never gave up because some people thought it was impossible to bring back the head of medusa  to king Polydecetes but Perseus strives for the task and succeeds.

The theme of the Perseus myth is Heroism. Greek heroes tend to share uncommon strength, immense bravery, and noble morality. They also depend upon a certain degree of clever ingenuity to achieve success. Perseus presented himself as brave and courage for trudging forward to one of the gorgon's, Medusa. He never gave up because some people thought it was impossible to bring back the head of medusa to king Polydecetes but Perseus strives for the task and succeeds.

Perseus with  the head of Medusa, in Florence~ the ancients carved statues of their history, and many believe these creatures of myth were creations of biogenetic engineering by an ancient yet advanced race.  Many of our own biogeneticists are on the cutting edge of creating two headed dogs and giving head transplants today.

Perseus with the head of Medusa, in Florence~ the ancients carved statues of their history, and many believe these creatures of myth were creations of biogenetic engineering by an ancient yet advanced race. Many of our own biogeneticists are on the cutting edge of creating two headed dogs and giving head transplants today.

The Cap of Invisibility has appeared in Greek myth: Hades was ascribed possession of a cap or helmet that made the wearer invisible. In some versions of the Perseus myth, Perseus borrows this cap from the goddess Athena and uses it to sneak up on the sleeping Medusa when he kills her.  A similar helmet, the Tarnhelm, is found in Norse mythology. In the Second Branch of the Mabinogi, one of the important texts of Welsh mythology, Caswallawn (the historical Cassivellaunus)

The Cap of Invisibility has appeared in Greek myth: Hades was ascribed possession of a cap or helmet that made the wearer invisible. In some versions of the Perseus myth, Perseus borrows this cap from the goddess Athena and uses it to sneak up on the sleeping Medusa when he kills her. A similar helmet, the Tarnhelm, is found in Norse mythology. In the Second Branch of the Mabinogi, one of the important texts of Welsh mythology, Caswallawn (the historical Cassivellaunus)

Clouds Of Perseus. “So remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet, try to make sense of what you see and wonder about what makes the universe exist. Be curious. And however difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at.” Stephen Hawking

Clouds Of Perseus. “So remember to look up at the stars and not down at your feet, try to make sense of what you see and wonder about what makes the universe exist. Be curious. And however difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at.” Stephen Hawking

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