Athene receives the head of Medousa from Perseus. The hero is depicted as a young man, wearing the winged boots of Hermes and the cap of darkness on his head. Athene holds the Gorgoneion (Gorgon head) by its snaky locks, its image reflecting in the mirror of the shield.  ca 400 - 385 BC

Athene receives the head of Medousa from Perseus. The hero is depicted as a young man, wearing the winged boots of Hermes and the cap of darkness on his head. Athene holds the Gorgoneion (Gorgon head) by its snaky locks, its image reflecting in the mirror of the shield. ca 400 - 385 BC

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The Cap of Invisibility has appeared in Greek myth: Hades was ascribed possession of a cap or helmet that made the wearer invisible. In some versions of the Perseus myth, Perseus borrows this cap from the goddess Athena and uses it to sneak up on the sleeping Medusa when he kills her.  A similar helmet, the Tarnhelm, is found in Norse mythology. In the Second Branch of the Mabinogi, one of the important texts of Welsh mythology, Caswallawn (the historical Cassivellaunus)

The Cap of Invisibility has appeared in Greek myth: Hades was ascribed possession of a cap or helmet that made the wearer invisible. In some versions of the Perseus myth, Perseus borrows this cap from the goddess Athena and uses it to sneak up on the sleeping Medusa when he kills her. A similar helmet, the Tarnhelm, is found in Norse mythology. In the Second Branch of the Mabinogi, one of the important texts of Welsh mythology, Caswallawn (the historical Cassivellaunus)

Medusa: In Greek mythology Medusa was a monster, a Gorgon, generally described as having the face of a hideous human female with living venomous snakes in place of hair. Gazing directly into her eyes would turn onlookers to stone. Most sources describe her as the daughter of Phorcys and Ceto. Medusa was beheaded by the hero Perseus, who thereafter used her head as a weapon until he gave it to the goddess Athena to place on her shield. #myth

Medusa: In Greek mythology Medusa was a monster, a Gorgon, generally described as having the face of a hideous human female with living venomous snakes in place of hair. Gazing directly into her eyes would turn onlookers to stone. Most sources describe her as the daughter of Phorcys and Ceto. Medusa was beheaded by the hero Perseus, who thereafter used her head as a weapon until he gave it to the goddess Athena to place on her shield. #myth

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Perseus: The Hunt for Medusa's Head: A Greek Myth - Greek Sirens - by Tom Yeates

Perseus: The Hunt for Medusa's Head: A Greek Myth - Greek Sirens - by Tom Yeates

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