Idolatry is "Fatal": Reza Aslan:  The earliest known English record of the term “anti-theist” dates back to 1788, but the first citation of the word can be found in the 1833 edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, where it is defined as “one opposed to belief in the existence of a god”. http://www.pinterest.com/pin/540924605218104308/ Einstein on the Abrahamic idolatries: The worship of false gods such as Yahweh is not only “unworthy but also fatal", with "incalculable harm to human…

Reza Aslan: Sam Harris and “New Atheists” aren’t new, aren’t even atheists

Idolatry is "Fatal": Reza Aslan: The earliest known English record of the term “anti-theist” dates back to 1788, but the first citation of the word can be found in the 1833 edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, where it is defined as “one opposed to belief in the existence of a god”. http://www.pinterest.com/pin/540924605218104308/ Einstein on the Abrahamic idolatries: The worship of false gods such as Yahweh is not only “unworthy but also fatal", with "incalculable harm to human…

Oxford Art Online contains the full text to the landmark art reference source, The Dictionary of Art. It's highlighted here since it's a great source to use to familiarize yourself with discipline specific terms, dates, and facts.

Oxford Art Online contains the full text to the landmark art reference source, The Dictionary of Art. It's highlighted here since it's a great source to use to familiarize yourself with discipline specific terms, dates, and facts.

The #Oxford English #Dictionary dates the expression “fairy tale” back to 1635 and “fairy story” slightly later. It was the French writer Marie-Catherine d’Aulnoy who popularised the term with her “Les Contes des Fées” (fairy tales) in 1697. However, the opening words “Once upon a time” are even older, dating back to #Chaucer in the 14th century #fairytale #fact

Random Fact: Fairy Tales

The #Oxford English #Dictionary dates the expression “fairy tale” back to 1635 and “fairy story” slightly later. It was the French writer Marie-Catherine d’Aulnoy who popularised the term with her “Les Contes des Fées” (fairy tales) in 1697. However, the opening words “Once upon a time” are even older, dating back to #Chaucer in the 14th century #fairytale #fact

@lovebylynn shows Nasty Gal around Salt Lake City - at Kilby Court #nastygalsabouttown #classicvenues. Pictured wearing the @jeffreycampbell Lester Plate Oxfords (http://www.nastygal.com/shoes-flats/jeffrey-campbell-lester-plated-oxford?utm_source=pinterest&utm_medium=smm&utm_term=ngdib_collab&utm_content=ng_about_town&utm_campaign=pinterest_nastygal)

@lovebylynn shows Nasty Gal around Salt Lake City - at Kilby Court #nastygalsabouttown #classicvenues. Pictured wearing the @jeffreycampbell Lester Plate Oxfords (http://www.nastygal.com/shoes-flats/jeffrey-campbell-lester-plated-oxford?utm_source=pinterest&utm_medium=smm&utm_term=ngdib_collab&utm_content=ng_about_town&utm_campaign=pinterest_nastygal)

While the exact origins of the pea coat are uncertain, the Oxford dictionary has the earliest uses of the term pea coat dating back to the early 18th century, from the term Pijjakker or pilot’s jacket in Dutch. One version of the current pea coat as we know it was adopted from the reefer jackets of the British Royal Navy.

Essential Winter Coat Guide

While the exact origins of the pea coat are uncertain, the Oxford dictionary has the earliest uses of the term pea coat dating back to the early 18th century, from the term Pijjakker or pilot’s jacket in Dutch. One version of the current pea coat as we know it was adopted from the reefer jackets of the British Royal Navy.

Dorchester-on-Thames is one of the very few sites in the country with major centres dating from the late Iron Age, Roman, and Anglo-Saxon periods that have not been largely obscured by later development. Members of the School of Archaeology, in collaboration with Oxford Archaeology and the local community, have been examining the area in and around the present day village as part of the long-term ‘Discovering Dorchester’ research project since 2007.

Dorchester-on-Thames is one of the very few sites in the country with major centres dating from the late Iron Age, Roman, and Anglo-Saxon periods that have not been largely obscured by later development. Members of the School of Archaeology, in collaboration with Oxford Archaeology and the local community, have been examining the area in and around the present day village as part of the long-term ‘Discovering Dorchester’ research project since 2007.

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