Alice Paul, suffragist, founder of the National Woman's Party, and author of the Equal Rights Amendment

Alice Paul, suffragist, founder of the National Woman's Party, and author of the Equal Rights Amendment

Women's Suffrage Protestors Taken to Prison  National Woman's Party White House Protests, 1917  National Woman's Party protestors are taken from the D.C. Court House to prison after their conviction in connection with White House protests for women's suffrage, 1917.

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Women's Suffrage Protestors Taken to Prison National Woman's Party White House Protests, 1917 National Woman's Party protestors are taken from the D.C. Court House to prison after their conviction in connection with White House protests for women's suffrage, 1917.

1917 - The "Silent Sentinels" , members of the National Woman's Party, picketed the White House from January 10, 1917 until June 1919.  Initially tolerated, they were arrested once WWI began. Many members of the National Woman's Party, including Alice Paul, went on hunger strike after arrest and were force fed by jail personnel.

1917 - The "Silent Sentinels" , members of the National Woman's Party, picketed the White House from January 10, 1917 until June 1919. Initially tolerated, they were arrested once WWI began. Many members of the National Woman's Party, including Alice Paul, went on hunger strike after arrest and were force fed by jail personnel.

Alice Paul, American rights activist and 1920's suffragist. She led 80,000 suffragists in a march on the eve of President Wilson's inauguration. 1916 whe founded the National Woman's Party.

Alice Paul, American rights activist and 1920's suffragist. She led 80,000 suffragists in a march on the eve of President Wilson's inauguration. 1916 whe founded the National Woman's Party.

American suffrage movement GOLD BANNER WITH PURPLE LETTERING PRODUCED BY THE NATIONAL WOMAN'S PARTY. THE PARTY, IN SPITE OF ITS CLOSE TIES TO THE BRITISH MOVEMENT, ADOPTED THE TRADITIONAL AMERICAN COLOR OF GOLD.

Women's Sufferage

American suffrage movement GOLD BANNER WITH PURPLE LETTERING PRODUCED BY THE NATIONAL WOMAN'S PARTY. THE PARTY, IN SPITE OF ITS CLOSE TIES TO THE BRITISH MOVEMENT, ADOPTED THE TRADITIONAL AMERICAN COLOR OF GOLD.

Mary Church Terrell - president of the National Association of Colored Women. She campaigned for black women's suffrage and even picketed the White House with members of the National Woman's Party.

Mary Church Terrell - president of the National Association of Colored Women. She campaigned for black women's suffrage and even picketed the White House with members of the National Woman's Party.

Lucy Burns (April 20, 1879 – September 15, 1966) was an American suffragist and women's rights advocate.[1] She was a passionate activist in the United States and in the United Kingdom. Burns was a close friend of Alice Paul, and together they ultimately formed the National Woman's Party. Lucy Burns spent more time in jail and endured horrible treatment and conditions in her quest to secure for women the right to vote. She is a true American hero.

Lucy Burns (April 20, 1879 – September 15, 1966) was an American suffragist and women's rights advocate.[1] She was a passionate activist in the United States and in the United Kingdom. Burns was a close friend of Alice Paul, and together they ultimately formed the National Woman's Party. Lucy Burns spent more time in jail and endured horrible treatment and conditions in her quest to secure for women the right to vote. She is a true American hero.

Conferring over ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution at the National Woman's Party headquarters in Washington, D.C. (L to R: Mrs. Lawrence Lewis, Abby Scott Baker, Anita Pollitzer, Alice Paul, Mabel Vernon, Florence Boeckel.) It is jarring to think that Woodrow Wilson and his cronies tried to persuade a psychiatrist to declare Alice Paul insane so they could permanently institutionalize her. The doctor admonished the men: "Courage in women is often mistaken for…

Conferring over ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution at the National Woman's Party headquarters in Washington, D.C. (L to R: Mrs. Lawrence Lewis, Abby Scott Baker, Anita Pollitzer, Alice Paul, Mabel Vernon, Florence Boeckel.) It is jarring to think that Woodrow Wilson and his cronies tried to persuade a psychiatrist to declare Alice Paul insane so they could permanently institutionalize her. The doctor admonished the men: "Courage in women is often mistaken for…

Prominent young girls of Seneca Falls as warriors in honor of the officers and members of the National Woman's party 1923

Prominent young girls of Seneca Falls as warriors in honor of the officers and members of the National Woman's party 1923

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