Jupiter's mysteries: First results from NASA's Juno mission - Jupiter was most likely the first planet to form in the solar system and contains some of the same ingredients of the collapsing nebula that formed the system. Knowing more about Jupiter can provide greater insight about its beginnings

Jupiter's mysteries: First results from NASA's Juno mission - Jupiter was most likely the first planet to form in the solar system and contains some of the same ingredients of the collapsing nebula that formed the system. Knowing more about Jupiter can provide greater insight about its beginnings

Nasa's Juno probe captures dramatic first close-up images of Jupiter | Science | The Guardian

Nasa's Juno probe captures dramatic first close-up images of Jupiter

Nasa's Juno probe captures dramatic first close-up images of Jupiter | Science | The Guardian

This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles

A Whole New Jupiter: First Science Results from NASA’s Juno Mission

This image shows Jupiter’s south pole, as seen by NASA’s Juno spacecraft from an altitude of 32,000 miles

This sequence of enhanced-color images shows how quickly the viewing geometry changes for NASA's Juno spacecraft as it swoops by Jupiter. Image credit: NASA/SWRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstadt/Sean Doran

This sequence of enhanced-color images shows how quickly the viewing geometry changes for NASA's Juno spacecraft as it swoops by Jupiter. Image credit: NASA/SWRI/MSSS/Gerald Eichstadt/Sean Doran

This sequence of enhanced-color images shows how quickly the viewing geometry changes for NASA's Juno spacecraft as it swoops by Jupiter. The images were obtained by JunoCam. Once every 53 days the Juno spacecraft swings close to Jupiter, speeding over its clouds. In just two hours, the spacecraft travels from a perch over Jupiter's north pole through its closest approach (perijove), then passes over the south pole on its way back out.

This sequence of enhanced-color images shows how quickly the viewing geometry changes for NASA's Juno spacecraft as it swoops by Jupiter. The images were obtained by JunoCam. Once every 53 days the Juno spacecraft swings close to Jupiter, speeding over its clouds. In just two hours, the spacecraft travels from a perch over Jupiter's north pole through its closest approach (perijove), then passes over the south pole on its way back out.

Media by Bryon Gloden CISSP published May 29 2017 at 12:53AM

May 29, 2017 at 12:48AM

NASA's Juno Reported Back, and Things Are Getting Weird https://futurism.com/nasas-juno-reported-back-and-things-are-getting-weird/?utm_campaign=coschedule&utm_source=pinterest&utm_medium=Futurism&utm_content=NASA%27s%20Juno%20Reported%20Back%2C%20and%20Things%20Are%20Getting%20Weird

NASA's Juno Reported Back, and Things Are Getting Weird https://futurism.com/nasas-juno-reported-back-and-things-are-getting-weird/?utm_campaign=coschedule&utm_source=pinterest&utm_medium=Futurism&utm_content=NASA%27s%20Juno%20Reported%20Back%2C%20and%20Things%20Are%20Getting%20Weird

NASA's Juno Spacecraft Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter.  The gas giant is getting really weird.  Just when we thought we had Jupiter all figured out, NASA's Juno spacecraft reveals new results that challenge almost every assumption we've made about the gas giant.

NASA's Juno Spacecraft Just Shattered What We Knew About Jupiter. The gas giant is getting really weird. Just when we thought we had Jupiter all figured out, NASA's Juno spacecraft reveals new results that challenge almost every assumption we've made about the gas giant.

This enhanced color view of Jupiter’s south pole was created by citizen scientist Gabriel Fiset using data from the JunoCam instrument on NASA’s Juno spacecraft. Oval storms dot the cloudscape. Approaching the pole, the organized turbulence of Jupiter’s belts and zones transitions into clusters of unorganized filamentary structures, streams of air that resemble giant tangled strings.

Approaching Jupiter

This enhanced color view of Jupiter’s south pole was created by citizen scientist Gabriel Fiset using data from the JunoCam instrument on NASA’s Juno spacecraft. Oval storms dot the cloudscape. Approaching the pole, the organized turbulence of Jupiter’s belts and zones transitions into clusters of unorganized filamentary structures, streams of air that resemble giant tangled strings.

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