"Beta Lambda", 1961 // Morris Louis (American, 1912–1962) // #art #painting #abstract

"Beta Lambda", 1961 // Morris Louis (American, 1912–1962) // #art #painting #abstract

Like this work of art. "Saf," by Morris Louis, magna on canvas, 98 1/2 by 141 inches, 1959.

Like this work of art. "Saf," by Morris Louis, magna on canvas, 98 1/2 by 141 inches, 1959.

66030: Morris Louis (1912-1962) Blue Pilaster II, 1960

66030: Morris Louis (1912-1962) Blue Pilaster II, 1960

Morris Louis, Point of Tranquility, acrylic on canvas, 1960 1 of 2 "The more I paint the more I'm aware of a difference in my approach and others. Am distrustful of over-simplifications but nonetheless think that there is nothing very new in any period of art: what is true is that it is only something new for the painter & that this thin edge is what matters."

Morris Louis, Point of Tranquility, acrylic on canvas, 1960 1 of 2 "The more I paint the more I'm aware of a difference in my approach and others. Am distrustful of over-simplifications but nonetheless think that there is nothing very new in any period of art: what is true is that it is only something new for the painter & that this thin edge is what matters."

Citation: Morris Louis standing in front of Untitled, ca. 1956 / unidentified photographer. Morris Louis and Morris Louis Estate papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Citation: Morris Louis standing in front of Untitled, ca. 1956 / unidentified photographer. Morris Louis and Morris Louis Estate papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Mor­ris Louis (1912-1962)  was an American painter. During the 1950s he became one of the earliest exponents of Color Field painting. Living in Washington, D.C. Louis, along with Kenneth Noland and other Washington painters formed an art movement that is known today as the Washington Color School.

Mor­ris Louis (1912-1962) was an American painter. During the 1950s he became one of the earliest exponents of Color Field painting. Living in Washington, D.C. Louis, along with Kenneth Noland and other Washington painters formed an art movement that is known today as the Washington Color School.

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