The Black and White Minstrel Show - we hadn't heard of PC in those days!

The Black and White Minstrel Show - we hadn't heard of PC in those days!

Early on, the roles that Blacks portrayed in any form of media was the "mammy" "uncle tom" "buck" "wench/jezebel" "mulatto" or "pickaninny" Sometimes, most times, blacks weren't even cast by blacks. They had whites in blackface portray Blacks on stage.   http://black-face.com/

Early on, the roles that Blacks portrayed in any form of media was the "mammy" "uncle tom" "buck" "wench/jezebel" "mulatto" or "pickaninny" Sometimes, most times, blacks weren't even cast by blacks. They had whites in blackface portray Blacks on stage. http://black-face.com/

The Black & White Minstrel Show - saw them at the London Palladium. Didn't realise at the time how non-PC this was as I was only little.

The Black & White Minstrel Show - saw them at the London Palladium. Didn't realise at the time how non-PC this was as I was only little.

This image depicts a black caricature, or an an image that paints African Americans as strange. The video below is a satire animated cartoon on the history of gun violence and racism in the  United States, from Michael Moore’s documentary “Bowling For Columbine.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJyKTilOQXA&list=FLv1sloFwrjDa1Zly2eDiRVw

This image depicts a black caricature, or an an image that paints African Americans as strange. The video below is a satire animated cartoon on the history of gun violence and racism in the United States, from Michael Moore’s documentary “Bowling For Columbine.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJyKTilOQXA&list=FLv1sloFwrjDa1Zly2eDiRVw

Don't get what's wrong with blackface? Here's why it's so offensive. - Its American origins can be traced to minstrel shows. In the mid to late nineteenth century, white actors would routinely use black grease paint on their faces when depicting plantation slaves and free blacks on stage.

Don't get what's wrong with blackface? Here's why it's so offensive. - Its American origins can be traced to minstrel shows. In the mid to late nineteenth century, white actors would routinely use black grease paint on their faces when depicting plantation slaves and free blacks on stage.

Drawing of a man in blackface make-up wearing raggedy clothes and white stockings, dancing a jig with an exaggerated facial expression.

Drawing of a man in blackface make-up wearing raggedy clothes and white stockings, dancing a jig with an exaggerated facial expression.

What did the entertainment look like in the 19th century? With slavery booming, racism was at the forefront of society and the gap in racial segregation was still open wide. Entertainment came from the traveling circus, theater troupes, ventriloquists, poets, comedians, and orchestras. In 1808, The ...What did the entertainment look like in the 19th century? With slavery booming, racism was at the forefront of society and the gap in racial segregation was still open wide. Entertainment came…

What did the entertainment look like in the 19th century? With slavery booming, racism was at the forefront of society and the gap in racial segregation was still open wide. Entertainment came from the traveling circus, theater troupes, ventriloquists, poets, comedians, and orchestras. In 1808, The ...What did the entertainment look like in the 19th century? With slavery booming, racism was at the forefront of society and the gap in racial segregation was still open wide. Entertainment came…

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