TRAPPIST-1 Solar System Comparison. This diagram compares the TRAPPIST-1 planet system with Earth's solar system. The size of Earth's sun is shown with regard to the red dwarf star, TRAPPIST-1. The position of the seven planets around TRAPPIST-1 are shown in relation to Mercury's orbit around the sun.

TRAPPIST-1 Solar System Comparison. This diagram compares the TRAPPIST-1 planet system with Earth's solar system. The size of Earth's sun is shown with regard to the red dwarf star, TRAPPIST-1. The position of the seven planets around TRAPPIST-1 are shown in relation to Mercury's orbit around the sun.

The precession of Mercury's orbit. Image credit: Mpfiz/Public domain.

The precession of Mercury's orbit. Image credit: Mpfiz/Public domain.

If you take each of the Platonic Solids and encase each perfectly within a sphere, and then nest them all inside of each other, they produce six layers that correspond to the relative planetary orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn.  Here are drawings representing the path of planets coupled together over several year periods, illustrating their geometric dance relationship in patters that look very similar to those made in Cymatics.

If you take each of the Platonic Solids and encase each perfectly within a sphere, and then nest them all inside of each other, they produce six layers that correspond to the relative planetary orbits of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. Here are drawings representing the path of planets coupled together over several year periods, illustrating their geometric dance relationship in patters that look very similar to those made in Cymatics.

The Solar System. Mercury Mercury fully rotates (One day) once every 58.646 Earth days Mercury Orbits the sun faster than any other planet A full orbit.

The Solar System. Mercury Mercury fully rotates (One day) once every 58.646 Earth days Mercury Orbits the sun faster than any other planet A full orbit.

The Sun is roughly middle-aged; it has not changed for 4 billion years and will remain stable for more than another 5 billion years. It will eventually become a red giant.The Sun will become large enough to engulf the current orbits of Mercury Venus and Earth.

The Sun is roughly middle-aged; it has not changed for 4 billion years and will remain stable for more than another 5 billion years. It will eventually become a red giant.The Sun will become large enough to engulf the current orbits of Mercury Venus and Earth.

Mercury orbits the Sun in a strange way (Credit: MESSENGER Teams/JHU APL/NASA)

Will we ever have a theory of everything?

Mercury orbits the Sun in a strange way (Credit: MESSENGER Teams/JHU APL/NASA)

Home of Lt Col. John H. Glenn Jr - Mercury Astronaut - Senator - First Man To Orbit The Earth - New Concord, Ohio - 2014

Home of Lt Col. John H. Glenn Jr - Mercury Astronaut - Senator - First Man To Orbit The Earth - New Concord, Ohio - 2014

The planets in the heavens move in exquisite orbital patterns, dancing to the Music of the Cosmos.  There is more mathematical and geometric harmony than we realize.   The idea for this article is from a book Larry Pesavento shared with me.  The book, 'A Little Book of Coincidence' by John Martineau, illustrates the orbital patterns and several of their geometrical relationships.  .

The planets in the heavens move in exquisite orbital patterns, dancing to the Music of the Cosmos. There is more mathematical and geometric harmony than we realize. The idea for this article is from a book Larry Pesavento shared with me. The book, 'A Little Book of Coincidence' by John Martineau, illustrates the orbital patterns and several of their geometrical relationships. .

Newton's laws of motion assume the force between two objects depends on the mass and distance of each and, using this, it is possible to calculate the orbits of planets precisely (stock image). However, Mercury's orbit was found to be an exception to this rule, which Einstein's General Relativity theory accounted for

How Einstein changed the world with his theory of general relativity

Newton's laws of motion assume the force between two objects depends on the mass and distance of each and, using this, it is possible to calculate the orbits of planets precisely (stock image). However, Mercury's orbit was found to be an exception to this rule, which Einstein's General Relativity theory accounted for

When astronomers announced the discovery of seven Earth-sized planets orbiting the ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1, Earthlings immediately celebrated the possibility that one of those planetary neighbors could host life. But to physicists, TRAPPIST-1 presented a puzzle: How could those seven planets, all packed around a single star closer than Mercury orbits the Sun, survive? Why haven’t they all crashed into each other?

An Amazing Hypothesis for Why the Trappist-1 System Hasn't Destroyed Itself

When astronomers announced the discovery of seven Earth-sized planets orbiting the ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1, Earthlings immediately celebrated the possibility that one of those planetary neighbors could host life. But to physicists, TRAPPIST-1 presented a puzzle: How could those seven planets, all packed around a single star closer than Mercury orbits the Sun, survive? Why haven’t they all crashed into each other?

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