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Phobos (Ancient Greek: Φόβος, meaning "fear") is the personification of fear in Greek mythology. He is the offspring of Aphrodite and Ares. He was known for accompanying Ares into battle along with the ancient war goddess Enyo, the goddess of discord Eris (both sisters of Ares), and Phobos' twin brother Deimos (terror).

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The Alaisiagae: Represent War, burial, victory & are revered in Celtic Scottish, Romano-British, German, Frisian From the Proto-Celtic Ad-lājsījā-agai meaning 'allative sending fears' Alaisiagae is a triple goddess who, unusually, seems to be made up of three pairs of connected deities. This includes the pairing of Baudihillia and Friagabis, and Beda and Fimmilena. The name of the third pairing is unknown, probably because it was never written down.Partly due to the meaning of their…

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Protection, defense, connection to the divine, activation of the higher self, taking flight, facing your fear, courage, success in social life, psychic powers. Algiz means elk. Associated deity from the mythology: Valkyries

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"Irish wit ring "A fool eats his last potato. A wise man plants it." Symbol of patience and overcoming fears

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The Badb (Old Irish) —meaning "crow"—is a war goddess who takes the form of a crow, and is thus sometimes known as Badb Catha ("battle crow"). She is known to cause fear and confusion among soldiers to move the tide of battle to her favoured side. Badb may also appear prior to a battle to foreshadow the extent of the carnage to come, or to predict the death of a notable person. She would sometimes do this through wailing cries, leading to comparisons with the bean-sídhe (banshee).

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In Irish mythology, the Badb (Old Irish, pronounced [ˈbaðβ]) or Badhbh (Modern Irish, pronounced [ˈbəiv])—meaning "crow"—is a war goddess who takes the form of a crow, and is thus sometimes known as Badb Catha ("battle crow"). She is known to cause fear and confusion among soldiers to move the tide of battle to her favoured side. Badb may also appear prior to a battle to foreshadow the extent of the carnage to come, or to predict the death of a notable person

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Ancient Folklore and Myths of the Outer Hebrides, Scotland - The Cù Sìth of Scottish mythology is an enormous, otherworldly hound, said to haunt the Scottish Highlands. Roughly the size of a large calf, the Cù Sìth was said to be black in color with shaggy fur and a long braided tail. The Cù Sìth was feared as a harbinger of death and would appear to bear away the soul of a person to the afterlife (Grim Reaper). Cù Sìth literally means "barrow hound".

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