Saint Margaret of Scotland b 1045, wife to Malcolm III b1031. Love her! June 10th - my wedding anniversary

Saint Margaret of Scotland b 1045, wife to Malcolm III b1031. Love her! June 10th - my wedding anniversary

Matilda of Flanders (c. 1031 – 2 November 1083) was the wife of William the Conqueror and, as such, Queen consort of the Kingdom of England. She bore William nine children, including two kings, William II and Henry I.

Matilda of Flanders (c. 1031 – 2 November 1083) was the wife of William the Conqueror and, as such, Queen consort of the Kingdom of England. She bore William nine children, including two kings, William II and Henry I.

Matilda the Musical - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Opening in April 2013  Very good Reviews in London

Matilda the Musical - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Opening in April 2013 Very good Reviews in London

So Matilda’s strong young mind continued to grow, nurtured by the voices of all those authors who had sent their books out into the world like ships on the sea. These books gave Matilda a hopeful and comforting message: You are not alone.

So Matilda’s strong young mind continued to grow, nurtured by the voices of all those authors who had sent their books out into the world like ships on the sea. These books gave Matilda a hopeful and comforting message: You are not alone.

William the Conqueror (1028-1087), illegitimate son of Herleva and Duke Robert the Magnificent of Normandy. 31st great grand-uncle.

William the Conqueror (1028-1087), illegitimate son of Herleva and Duke Robert the Magnificent of Normandy. 31st great grand-uncle.

The Matilda effect is the systematic repression and denial of the contribution of women scientists in research, whose work is often attributed to their male colleagues. This effect was first described in 1993 by science historian Margaret W. Rossiter. It is named after the U.S. women's rights activist Matilda Joslyn Gage, who first observed this phenomenon at the end of the 19th century. (from Wikipedia)

The Matilda effect is the systematic repression and denial of the contribution of women scientists in research, whose work is often attributed to their male colleagues. This effect was first described in 1993 by science historian Margaret W. Rossiter. It is named after the U.S. women's rights activist Matilda Joslyn Gage, who first observed this phenomenon at the end of the 19th century. (from Wikipedia)

Image - Matilda bird.png - Angry Birds Wiki - Wikia

Matilda bird.png

Image - Matilda bird.png - Angry Birds Wiki - Wikia

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