Nobel Prize winners Marie and Pierre Curie discovered radium in 1898.

Dec. 21, 1898: The Curies Discover Radium

Pierre and Marie Curie shortly after their wedding, 1895, Sceaux -nd  [for their wedding contract] - There was no lawyers necessary, as the marriage pair possessed nothing in the world - nothing but two glittering bicycles bought the day before with money sent as a present from a cousin, with which they were going to roam the countryside in the coming summer.  — Ève Curie, in Madame Curie (1938)

Pierre and Marie Curie shortly after their wedding, 1895, Sceaux -nd [for their wedding contract] - There was no lawyers necessary, as the marriage pair possessed nothing in the world - nothing but two glittering bicycles bought the day before with money sent as a present from a cousin, with which they were going to roam the countryside in the coming summer. — Ève Curie, in Madame Curie (1938)

Irene Joliot-Curie: 1897-1956; The French physical chemist Irene Joliot-Curie was awarded, with her husband, the 1935 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for the discovery of new radioactive isotopes prepared artificially.  She was the daughter of Nobel Prize winners Pierre and Marie Curie.

Irene Joliot-Curie: 1897-1956; The French physical chemist Irene Joliot-Curie was awarded, with her husband, the 1935 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for the discovery of new radioactive isotopes prepared artificially. She was the daughter of Nobel Prize winners Pierre and Marie Curie.

Wedding photo of Pierre and Marie Curie, 1895....Marie Curie was a Polish physicist and chemist who lived between 1867-1934. Together with her husband, Pierre, she discovered two new elements (radium and polonium, two radioactive elements that they extracted chemically from pitchblende ore) and studied the x-rays they emitted. She found that the harmful properties of x-rays were able to kill tumors. By the end of World War I, Marie Curie was probably the most famous woman in the world....

Wedding photo of Pierre and Marie Curie, 1895....Marie Curie was a Polish physicist and chemist who lived between 1867-1934. Together with her husband, Pierre, she discovered two new elements (radium and polonium, two radioactive elements that they extracted chemically from pitchblende ore) and studied the x-rays they emitted. She found that the harmful properties of x-rays were able to kill tumors. By the end of World War I, Marie Curie was probably the most famous woman in the world....

Marie Curie ~ "Marie Skłodowska-Curie (7 November 1867 – 4 July 1934) was a French-Polish physicist and chemist famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first person honored with two Nobel Prizes – in physics and chemistry. She was the first female professor at the University of Paris, and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in the Panthéon in Paris."

Marie Curie ~ "Marie Skłodowska-Curie (7 November 1867 – 4 July 1934) was a French-Polish physicist and chemist famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first person honored with two Nobel Prizes – in physics and chemistry. She was the first female professor at the University of Paris, and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in the Panthéon in Paris."

Marie Curie: A Biography of a Scientist Series

Marie Curie: A Biography of a Scientist Series

Marie Curie became the first well-known female physicist and chemist with her research on radioactivity. Her work would lead her to the discovery of two radioactive elements radium and polonium, an element name in honor of her country Poland.

Even renowned chemists will leave the lab behind for a romantic honeymoon. Pierre and Marie Curie met at the Sorbonne in Paris, and they achieved fame in the science world for their studies of radioactivity, which later earned them a Nobel Prize. When Pierre was killed in 1906, Marie was appointed to his position at the Sorbonne, where he had been a professor of physics.    Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Famous Historical Couples

Even renowned chemists will leave the lab behind for a romantic honeymoon. Pierre and Marie Curie met at the Sorbonne in Paris, and they achieved fame in the science world for their studies of radioactivity, which later earned them a Nobel Prize. When Pierre was killed in 1906, Marie was appointed to his position at the Sorbonne, where he had been a professor of physics. Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Marie Curie 1867 – 1934. Winner of two Nobel Prizes (in Chemistry AND Physics) Curie also discovered the radioactive elements polonium and radium and was, in general, a scientific powerhouse. Favorite Lumosity game: Penguin Pursuit

Marie Curie 1867 – 1934. Winner of two Nobel Prizes (in Chemistry AND Physics) Curie also discovered the radioactive elements polonium and radium and was, in general, a scientific powerhouse. Favorite Lumosity game: Penguin Pursuit

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