Basically unchanged for 300 million years (!), triops are truly a fascinating living fossil. They make a great short-lived pet for the curious observer and burgeoning biologist.

Basically unchanged for 300 million years (!), triops are truly a fascinating living fossil. They make a great short-lived pet for the curious observer and burgeoning biologist.

Ginkgo Biloba: The Living Fossil - Do not agree with all that is said in this article, but it does have some good info.

Ginkgo Biloba: The Living Fossil - Do not agree with all that is said in this article, but it does have some good info.

Still Evolving Studies of tadpole shrimp and other organisms show that the term “living fossil” is misleading.

Still Evolving Studies of tadpole shrimp and other organisms show that the term “living fossil” is misleading.

'Living fossil' coelacanth genome sequenced - One of my favorite 'fossil' stories.

'Living fossil' coelacanth genome sequenced

endangeredanimalblog:    The COELACANTH is referred to as a living fossil because it is the only remaining species of a group of fish species that died out millions of years ago. It is found in the deep coastal waters of eastern Africa, where rocky shores are battered by strong oceanic currents. A large fish, growing to a length of about 6 feet, and it moves along the rocky slopes with the help of fleshy pectoral fins. Populations  are thought to be critically low.

endangeredanimalblog: The COELACANTH is referred to as a living fossil because it is the only remaining species of a group of fish species that died out millions of years ago. It is found in the deep coastal waters of eastern Africa, where rocky shores are battered by strong oceanic currents. A large fish, growing to a length of about 6 feet, and it moves along the rocky slopes with the help of fleshy pectoral fins. Populations are thought to be critically low.

Once thought to be extinct in the same event that killed off the dinosaurs some 65 million years ago, the coelacanth is a lobe-finned fish that sparked a debate over whether this species represented a missing link between aquatic animals and four-legged terrestrial creatures, according to National Geographic. The animal was rediscovered in 1938 and only two species of coelacanth still exist today. In 2007, a fossilized coelacanth fin was found dating back roughly 400 million years.

Once thought to be extinct in the same event that killed off the dinosaurs some 65 million years ago, the coelacanth is a lobe-finned fish that sparked a debate over whether this species represented a missing link between aquatic animals and four-legged terrestrial creatures, according to National Geographic. The animal was rediscovered in 1938 and only two species of coelacanth still exist today. In 2007, a fossilized coelacanth fin was found dating back roughly 400 million years.

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