Dr. Lise Meitner (1878-1968) - Jewish Austrian-Swedish physicist known for her co-discovery of nuclear fission. In 1906 she became the 2nd woman ever to graduate with a doctorate of physics from the University of Vienna. When asked to join the Manhattan Project, Meitner refused, declaring ‘I will have nothing to do with a bomb!’ The inscription on her headstone reads “Lise Meitner: a physicist who never lost her humanity.”

Dr. Lise Meitner (1878-1968) - Jewish Austrian-Swedish physicist known for her co-discovery of nuclear fission. In 1906 she became the 2nd woman ever to graduate with a doctorate of physics from the University of Vienna. When asked to join the Manhattan Project, Meitner refused, declaring ‘I will have nothing to do with a bomb!’ The inscription on her headstone reads “Lise Meitner: a physicist who never lost her humanity.”

Lise Meitner (1878 - 1968) was an Austrian physicist who interpreted the data and worked out the mathematics to prove that atoms could be split. Although offered work on the Manhattan Project, she refused because she didn't want to work on a bomb. Because she fled the Nazis, her research partner got credit for the discovery and won a Nobel Prize.

Lise Meitner (1878 - 1968) was an Austrian physicist who interpreted the data and worked out the mathematics to prove that atoms could be split. Although offered work on the Manhattan Project, she refused because she didn't want to work on a bomb. Because she fled the Nazis, her research partner got credit for the discovery and won a Nobel Prize.

Lise Meitner, nuclear physicist. She’s part of my #WomeninSTEM jewelry line at AubergDesigns.com!  http://ift.tt/1Ed5YE4

Lise Meitner, nuclear physicist. She’s part of my #WomeninSTEM jewelry line at AubergDesigns.com! http://ift.tt/1Ed5YE4

Lise Meitner, (7 November 1878 – 27 October 1968) was an Austrian, later Swedish, physicist who worked on radioactivity and nuclear physics...

Lise Meitner, (7 November 1878 – 27 October 1968) was an Austrian, later Swedish, physicist who worked on radioactivity and nuclear physics...

Recently, New Scientist had an article about Emmy Noether because 2015 is the one hundredth anniversary of Noether’s Theorem. I’m not going to link to it because it’s behind a pay wall. A couple of…

Unsung? I hardly think so

Recently, New Scientist had an article about Emmy Noether because 2015 is the one hundredth anniversary of Noether’s Theorem. I’m not going to link to it because it’s behind a pay wall. A couple of…

Lise Meitner was a physicist who played a major role to develop nuclear fission. Yet when she gave a lecture to an audience in Berlin on "Problems of Cosmic Physics" it was reported in the newspapers as "Problems of Cosmetic Physics". One wonders whether they thought physics itself was purely cosmetic or that women could do only cosmetic physics. The element Meitnerium, a transuranian element, is named after her.

Lise Meitner was a physicist who played a major role to develop nuclear fission. Yet when she gave a lecture to an audience in Berlin on "Problems of Cosmic Physics" it was reported in the newspapers as "Problems of Cosmetic Physics". One wonders whether they thought physics itself was purely cosmetic or that women could do only cosmetic physics. The element Meitnerium, a transuranian element, is named after her.

Lise Meitner  (7 or 17 November 1878 – 27 October 1968) was an Austrian-born Physicist. Meitner was part of the team that discovered nuclear fission, an achievement for which her colleague Otto Hahn was awarded the Nobel Prize. Meitner is often mentioned as one of the most glaring examples of women’s scientific achievement overlooked by the Nobel committee.

Lise Meitner (7 or 17 November 1878 – 27 October 1968) was an Austrian-born Physicist. Meitner was part of the team that discovered nuclear fission, an achievement for which her colleague Otto Hahn was awarded the Nobel Prize. Meitner is often mentioned as one of the most glaring examples of women’s scientific achievement overlooked by the Nobel committee.

Women in science that U should know...and probably don't  "I didn't succumb to the stereotype that science wasn't for girls."  ~ Sally Ride  Also listed: Mary Somerville, Caroline Herschel, Mary Anning, Emmy Noether, Alice Catherine Evans, Dorothy Hodgkin, Rosalind Franklin, Mildred Dresselhaus, Jocelyn Bell Burnell, Lise Meitner, Annie Scott Dill Maunder, Henrietta Swan Leavitt [click on this image to find a short link & analysis of gendered socialization & the absence of women in…

Women in science that U should know...and probably don't "I didn't succumb to the stereotype that science wasn't for girls." ~ Sally Ride Also listed: Mary Somerville, Caroline Herschel, Mary Anning, Emmy Noether, Alice Catherine Evans, Dorothy Hodgkin, Rosalind Franklin, Mildred Dresselhaus, Jocelyn Bell Burnell, Lise Meitner, Annie Scott Dill Maunder, Henrietta Swan Leavitt [click on this image to find a short link & analysis of gendered socialization & the absence of women in…

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