Late Heavy Bombardment - 'The Late Heavy Bombardment (commonly referred to as the lunar cataclysm, or LHB) is a hypothetical event around 4.1 to 3.8 billion years ago. During this event an extraordinary number of the impact craters on the Moon would have formed, and by inference an extraordinary large number of impacts on Earth...  Extrapolating lunar cratering rates to Earth:   22,000 craters with diameters >20 km,  about 40 > 1,000 km, several > 5,000 km'

Late Heavy Bombardment - 'The Late Heavy Bombardment (commonly referred to as the lunar cataclysm, or LHB) is a hypothetical event around 4.1 to 3.8 billion years ago. During this event an extraordinary number of the impact craters on the Moon would have formed, and by inference an extraordinary large number of impacts on Earth... Extrapolating lunar cratering rates to Earth: 22,000 craters with diameters >20 km, about 40 > 1,000 km, several > 5,000 km'

Even though the Late Heavy Bombardment is somewhat of a controversial idea, new research has revealed this period of impacts to the Earth-Moon system may h

Even though the Late Heavy Bombardment is somewhat of a controversial idea, new research has revealed this period of impacts to the Earth-Moon system may h

Fomalhaut system could be experiencing its own version of our Late Heavy Bombardment.

Fomalhaut system could be experiencing its own version of our Late Heavy Bombardment.

The Late Heavy Bombardment (abbreviated LHB and also known as the lunar cataclysm) is a hypothetical event thought to have occurred approximately 4.1 to 3.8 billion years (Ga) ago,[1] corresponding to the Neohadean and Eoarchean eras on Earth. During this interval, a disproportionately large number of asteroids apparently collided with the early terrestrial planets in the inner Solar System, including Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars.

The Late Heavy Bombardment (abbreviated LHB and also known as the lunar cataclysm) is a hypothetical event thought to have occurred approximately 4.1 to 3.8 billion years (Ga) ago,[1] corresponding to the Neohadean and Eoarchean eras on Earth. During this interval, a disproportionately large number of asteroids apparently collided with the early terrestrial planets in the inner Solar System, including Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars.

"A close-up view of our moon detailing the many craters on its surface. The mosaic of 16 frames captures the craters of Copernicus, Kepler, Aristarchus, and Grimaldi, which were created between 3.8 to 4.1 billion years ago from continuous impacts from high-speed asteroids, in a period that is known as the Late Heavy Bombardment. Also seen in the image is the gloomy Ocean of Storms, a huge lunar mare or sea, made up of solidified basalt from volcanic activity that took place after the Late…

The Most Astonishing Photos That Won Awards In 2015

"A close-up view of our moon detailing the many craters on its surface. The mosaic of 16 frames captures the craters of Copernicus, Kepler, Aristarchus, and Grimaldi, which were created between 3.8 to 4.1 billion years ago from continuous impacts from high-speed asteroids, in a period that is known as the Late Heavy Bombardment. Also seen in the image is the gloomy Ocean of Storms, a huge lunar mare or sea, made up of solidified basalt from volcanic activity that took place after the Late…

The Late Heavy Bombardment (wide).PNG

The Late Heavy Bombardment (wide).PNG

BBC Earth - Timeline - The Late Heavy Bombardment and the early Earth

BBC Earth - Timeline - The Late Heavy Bombardment and the early Earth

Incoming! The LHB probably lasted a lot longer than previously thought, with some really big blasts, too.

Incoming! The LHB probably lasted a lot longer than previously thought, with some really big blasts, too.

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