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from Gardening Know How

Planting Dogwood Kousa Tree – How To Take Care Of Kousa Dogwoods

When looking for an attractive specimen tree for their landscaping design, many homeowners go no further when they come upon the Kousa dogwood. Read here to get tips for growing Kousa dogwood trees.

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Kousa Dogwood, Kousa Dogwood is native to China, Korea, and Japan. The fruit looks something like a strawberry, a pink soccer ball on a stick, or a sea urchin skeleton. Kousa Dogwood fruit is made up of 20-40 pinkish-orangish red fleshy carpels that are all fused together in a spherical arrangement atop a 3-4 inch long stem. Nice ripe Kousa Dogwood fruit Throughout their native range, Kousa Dogwood fruit are eaten fresh or fermented to make wine

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The Kousa Dogwood (Cornus kousa chinesis) is a deciduous tree with a specialized leaf system (bract), that creates a showy white appearance throughout the summer. This tree would look stunning planted in small groupings along your home or as a focal point in your front yard.

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Kousa Dogwood: small ornamental tree with four-season appeal (foliage, flowers, fruits, shape, and bark); very long-lasting and showy flowers, blooming in late Spring and early Summer; vased growth habit, becoming arching and layered with age ornamental bark with age superior disease/pest resistance among the showy-flowering Dogwoods

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from Gardening Know How

Planting Dogwood Kousa Tree – How To Take Care Of Kousa Dogwoods

When looking for an attractive specimen tree for their landscaping design, many homeowners go no further when they come upon the Kousa dogwood. Read here to get tips for growing Kousa dogwood trees.

"Heavy fruit production on this Kousa Dogwood" " "Throughout their native range, Kousa Dogwood fruit are eaten fresh or fermented to make wine. The landowner allowed me to sample a few and I found that they have a soft creamy texture and sweet flavor similar to papaya. However, the skins are slightly coarse and mildly bitter, so I have learned to break them open and suck out the pulp."

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