Kamehameha I, ca. 1758 – May 8, 1819), also known as Kamehameha the Great, conquered the Hawaiian Islands and formally established the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi in 1810.  Born at Kapakai Kokoiki Heiau, Kohala, Hawaiʻi (Big)  Island. Hawaiian legends claimed that a great king would one day unite the islands, and that the sign of his birth would be a comet. Halley's comet was visible from Hawaiʻi in 1758 and it is likely Kamehameha was born shortly after its appearance.

Kamehameha I, ca. 1758 – May 8, 1819), also known as Kamehameha the Great, conquered the Hawaiian Islands and formally established the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi in 1810. Born at Kapakai Kokoiki Heiau, Kohala, Hawaiʻi (Big) Island. Hawaiian legends claimed that a great king would one day unite the islands, and that the sign of his birth would be a comet. Halley's comet was visible from Hawaiʻi in 1758 and it is likely Kamehameha was born shortly after its appearance.

In Ancient Hawai’i - a period from the Polynesian settlement in 600 AD until Kamehameha’s monarchy in 1810 – an extensive kapu system governed the islands. Kapu, roughly translated as “forbidden,” consisted of a series of laws that dictated daily life. Common men could not tread on royal ground. No one was allowed to step in the shadow of the chief. Women were forbidden from eating particularly phallic-looking bananas. The punishment for breaking these mandates? Death as human sacrifice…

Place of Refuge

In Ancient Hawai’i - a period from the Polynesian settlement in 600 AD until Kamehameha’s monarchy in 1810 – an extensive kapu system governed the islands. Kapu, roughly translated as “forbidden,” consisted of a series of laws that dictated daily life. Common men could not tread on royal ground. No one was allowed to step in the shadow of the chief. Women were forbidden from eating particularly phallic-looking bananas. The punishment for breaking these mandates? Death as human sacrifice…

Draped in leis; Statue of King Kamehameha I in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Draped in leis; Statue of King Kamehameha I in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Statue of King Kamehameha I ~ Opposite the Iolani Palace in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Statue of King Kamehameha I ~ Opposite the Iolani Palace in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Statute of Kamehameha I @ Iolani Palace Hawaii's last monarch and only palace on U.S. soil.

30 of the Best Things to Do on the Island of Oahu

Statute of Kamehameha I @ Iolani Palace Hawaii's last monarch and only palace on U.S. soil.

Kamehameha I - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kamehameha I - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pinterest
Search