[>FACTOID: The Jungle Cat has a broad but patchy distribution extending from Egypt through Southwest, Central, and Southeast Asia, including the Indian subcontinent. Melanistic individuals have been reported from India and Pakistan. These cats prefer tall grass, thick bush, riverine swamps, and reed beds. There are few records from dense jungle. Jungle Cats are sometimes found around man-made fish ponds, reservoirs, and landscapes irrigated by sprinklers.

[>FACTOID: The Jungle Cat has a broad but patchy distribution extending from Egypt through Southwest, Central, and Southeast Asia, including the Indian subcontinent. Melanistic individuals have been reported from India and Pakistan. These cats prefer tall grass, thick bush, riverine swamps, and reed beds. There are few records from dense jungle. Jungle Cats are sometimes found around man-made fish ponds, reservoirs, and landscapes irrigated by sprinklers.

This is a Jungle Cat common in Asia and India.   They resemble a Lynx because of their tufts of hair above the ears but Jungle Cats are not related to Lynx. They are known to swim short distances.

This is a Jungle Cat common in Asia and India. They resemble a Lynx because of their tufts of hair above the ears but Jungle Cats are not related to Lynx. They are known to swim short distances.

Jungle cat_Bon Biral_(L.N.Baghdasha)_Sc.N-Felis chaus_Teghoria_S.Karanigonj_2011

Jungle cat_Bon Biral_(L.N.Baghdasha)_Sc.N-Felis chaus_Teghoria_S.Karanigonj_2011

A Liger! The awesome hybrid cross between a female tiger and a male lion. They are the largest of all the jungle cats, "growing to almost the lion and tigers combined size." Interestingly, "in history there have been stories of ligers found in the wild. Ligers were long thought to be sterile, but this theory was disproved in 1953, when a 15 year old liger was successfully mated with a male lion. The cub survived into adulthood, despite having poor health."

A Liger! The awesome hybrid cross between a female tiger and a male lion. They are the largest of all the jungle cats, "growing to almost the lion and tigers combined size." Interestingly, "in history there have been stories of ligers found in the wild. Ligers were long thought to be sterile, but this theory was disproved in 1953, when a 15 year old liger was successfully mated with a male lion. The cub survived into adulthood, despite having poor health."

Pinterest
Search