John Berger / Ways of Seeing , Episode 1 (1972) - YouTube. Old but still extremely relevant & educative... At least for adult art students.

John Berger / Ways of Seeing , Episode 1 (1972) - YouTube. Old but still extremely relevant & educative... At least for adult art students.

Ways of Seeing: John Berger's Classic 1972 BBC Critique of Consumer Culture | Brain Pickings

Ways of Seeing: John Berger’s Classic 1972 BBC Critique of Consumer Culture

Ways of Seeing: John Berger's Classic 1972 BBC Critique of Consumer Culture | Brain Pickings

John Berger / Ways of Seeing , Episode 2 (1972) Very interesting view if the differences between men and women. Good discussion starter, is it still true? "Men see the world, women see the world seeing them."

John Berger / Ways of Seeing , Episode 2 (1972) Very interesting view if the differences between men and women. Good discussion starter, is it still true? "Men see the world, women see the world seeing them."

Kate Kellaway, "John Berger: ‘If I’m a storyteller it’s because I listen’," The Guardian (30 October 2016). On the eve of his 90th birthday, one of the most influential writers of his generation talks about migration, Brexit, growing old – and his fondness for texting.

John Berger: ‘If I’m a storyteller it’s because I listen’

Kate Kellaway, "John Berger: ‘If I’m a storyteller it’s because I listen’," The Guardian (30 October 2016). On the eve of his 90th birthday, one of the most influential writers of his generation talks about migration, Brexit, growing old – and his fondness for texting.

Why we still need John Berger's Ways of Seeing | “You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her,” wrote Berger, “Put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting ‘Vanity,’ thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for you own pleasure.”

Why we still need John Berger’s Ways of Seeing

Why we still need John Berger's Ways of Seeing | “You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her,” wrote Berger, “Put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting ‘Vanity,’ thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for you own pleasure.”

John Berger (1926) - English art critic, novelist, painter and poet. Photo by Jean Mohr

John Berger (1926) - English art critic, novelist, painter and poet. Photo by Jean Mohr

WAYS OF SEEING  (first episode) 3/4

WAYS OF SEEING (first episode) 3/4

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