Tengu- Japanese folklore: an avian creature with human characteristics. They were thought of as evil malignant spirits or protective guardians.

Tengu- Japanese folklore: an avian creature with human characteristics. They were thought of as evil malignant spirits or protective guardians.

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Filler? The sparkly looking stuff Moon: In Japanese folklore, the rabbit (usagi) resides on the

Filler? The sparkly looking stuff Moon: In Japanese folklore, the rabbit (usagi) resides on the

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Rokurokubi are demons found in Japanese folklore. They look like normal human beings by day, but at night they gain the ability to stretch their necks to great lengths. They can also change their faces to those of terrifying oni to better scare mortals.  In their daytime human forms, rokurokubi often live undetected and may even take mortal spouses. Many rokurokubi become so accustomed to such a life that they take great pains to keep their demonic forms secret.

Rokurokubi are demons found in Japanese folklore. They look like normal human beings by day, but at night they gain the ability to stretch their necks to great lengths. They can also change their faces to those of terrifying oni to better scare mortals. In their daytime human forms, rokurokubi often live undetected and may even take mortal spouses. Many rokurokubi become so accustomed to such a life that they take great pains to keep their demonic forms secret.

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Keukegen- Japanese folklore: a creature covered in black fur that lives in peoples houses. Its name means "rarely seen". It was a disease spirit, inflicting sickness into those who lived in its host house.

Keukegen- Japanese folklore: a creature covered in black fur that lives in peoples houses. Its name means "rarely seen". It was a disease spirit, inflicting sickness into those who lived in its host house.

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Sara-hebi (さら蛇) is a large, snake-like creature with the head of a woman. Yokai Ghost stories from Japanese folklore.

Sara-hebi (さら蛇) is a large, snake-like creature with the head of a woman. Yokai Ghost stories from Japanese folklore.

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Kuchisake-Onna (The Slit Mouthed Woman) - Japanese folklore: She was once the very beautiful wife or concubine of a samurai. In a jealous rage, he mutilated her face. Her ghost returned, covering part of her face with a kimono sleeve, asking wanderers "Do you think I'm beautiful?"  She would reveal her face with a 'yes' and ask "Do you think I'm Beautiful now?"  Various bad things happen with just about any answer. Her modern form seems to wear a 'cold mask'; modern sightings have caused…

Kuchisake-Onna (The Slit Mouthed Woman) - Japanese folklore: She was once the very beautiful wife or concubine of a samurai. In a jealous rage, he mutilated her face. Her ghost returned, covering part of her face with a kimono sleeve, asking wanderers "Do you think I'm beautiful?" She would reveal her face with a 'yes' and ask "Do you think I'm Beautiful now?" Various bad things happen with just about any answer. Her modern form seems to wear a 'cold mask'; modern sightings have caused…

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According to Japanese folklore, a cat (neko) that has lived for a long time can become a kind of youkai called a nekomata (猫叉). It was believed that after a cat reached ten years of age, its tail would slowly split into two tails, and, along the way, it would develop magic powers, primarily those of necromancy and shamanism. Nekomata also have an ability to shape shift into a human form and are generally hostile to humans.  There is also one kind of Nekomata that lived in Nabes

According to Japanese folklore, a cat (neko) that has lived for a long time can become a kind of youkai called a nekomata (猫叉). It was believed that after a cat reached ten years of age, its tail would slowly split into two tails, and, along the way, it would develop magic powers, primarily those of necromancy and shamanism. Nekomata also have an ability to shape shift into a human form and are generally hostile to humans. There is also one kind of Nekomata that lived in Nabes

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A futakuchi-onna (二口女) is a type of yokai from Japanese folklore that is in the form of a woman with two mouths: one normal mouth, and one big mouth on the back of her head.   ((((;゜Д゜)))  Full Story: www.facebook.com/JapanLoverMe  Art by Little Miss Paintbrush ♥ Sharing the Worldwide JapanLove ♥ www.japanlover.me ♥ www.instagram.com/JapanLoverMe

A futakuchi-onna (二口女) is a type of yokai from Japanese folklore that is in the form of a woman with two mouths: one normal mouth, and one big mouth on the back of her head. ((((;゜Д゜))) Full Story: www.facebook.com/JapanLoverMe Art by Little Miss Paintbrush ♥ Sharing the Worldwide JapanLove ♥ www.japanlover.me ♥ www.instagram.com/JapanLoverMe

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Enenra- Japanese folklore: a creature composed entirely of smoke. It resided in bonfires and it could take the form of a human. It could only be seen by those who have a pure heart.

Enenra- Japanese folklore: a creature composed entirely of smoke. It resided in bonfires and it could take the form of a human. It could only be seen by those who have a pure heart.

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Baku: The Legend of the Dream Eater: The baku, otherwise known as the ‘dream eater’, is a mythological being or spirit in Chinese and Japanese folklore which is said to devour nightmares. The baku cannot be summoned without caution, however, as ancient legends say that if the baku is not satisfied after consuming the nightmare, he may also devour one’s hopes and dreams.

Baku: The Legend of the Dream Eater: The baku, otherwise known as the ‘dream eater’, is a mythological being or spirit in Chinese and Japanese folklore which is said to devour nightmares. The baku cannot be summoned without caution, however, as ancient legends say that if the baku is not satisfied after consuming the nightmare, he may also devour one’s hopes and dreams.

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