Japanese photographer Wataru Yamamoto's series titled “Leaf of Electric Light,” currently part of the Bio Art exhibition. Yamamoto uses a process known as Kirlian photography to create ghostly, ephemeral images of leaves.

Japanese photographer Wataru Yamamoto's series titled “Leaf of Electric Light,” currently part of the Bio Art exhibition. Yamamoto uses a process known as Kirlian photography to create ghostly, ephemeral images of leaves.

Wataru Yamamoto is a 27-year old photographer currently finishing up a Master’s degree at Tama Art University. In a series titled “Leaf of Electric Light,” currently part of the Bio Art exhibition, Yamamoto uses a process known as Kirlian photography to create ghostly, ephemeral images of leaves

Wataru Yamamoto is a 27-year old photographer currently finishing up a Master’s degree at Tama Art University. In a series titled “Leaf of Electric Light,” currently part of the Bio Art exhibition, Yamamoto uses a process known as Kirlian photography to create ghostly, ephemeral images of leaves

Wataru Yamamoto is a 27-year old photographer currently finishing up a Master’s degree at Tama Art University. In a series titled “Leaf of Electric Light,” currently part of the Bio Art exhibition, Yamamoto uses a process known as Kirlian photography to create ghostly, ephemeral images of leaves.

Wataru Yamamoto is a 27-year old photographer currently finishing up a Master’s degree at Tama Art University. In a series titled “Leaf of Electric Light,” currently part of the Bio Art exhibition, Yamamoto uses a process known as Kirlian photography to create ghostly, ephemeral images of leaves.

A paleobotanist and a computational neuroscientist used 7,597 images of leaves to teach a computer about botany.

A paleobotanist and a computational neuroscientist used 7,597 images of leaves to teach a computer about botany.

A paleobotanist and a computational neuroscientist used 7,597 images of leaves to teach a computer about botany.

A paleobotanist and a computational neuroscientist used 7,597 images of leaves to teach a computer about botany.

A paleobotanist and a computational neuroscientist used 7,597 images of leaves to teach a computer about botany.

A paleobotanist and a computational neuroscientist used 7,597 images of leaves to teach a computer about botany.

It is an honor for me to present what I believe to be the first Internet images of Lalique’s comb, “Metamorphosis.” It is ivory, with gold trim, pearls on the gold. The trim is faceted to the ivory by nails on the side and gold loops ended by lapis hearts. In it, a woman is born out of leaves: Rodin on a comb, an astonishing marriage of art and functional design. (from Fuck Yeah René Lalique on tumblr).

It is an honor for me to present what I believe to be the first Internet images of Lalique’s comb, “Metamorphosis.” It is ivory, with gold trim, pearls on the gold. The trim is faceted to the ivory by nails on the side and gold loops ended by lapis hearts. In it, a woman is born out of leaves: Rodin on a comb, an astonishing marriage of art and functional design. (from Fuck Yeah René Lalique on tumblr).

Maize leaves - Fernan Federici, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile and University of Cambridge

Maize leaves - Fernan Federici, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile and University of Cambridge

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