Charles Joseph Coward, known as the “Count of Auschwitz”, was a British soldier captured during World War II who rescued Jews from Auschwitz and smuggled himself into Auschwitz for one night, subsequently testifying about his experience at the Nuremberg Trials and the IG Farben Trial.

Charles Joseph Coward, known as the “Count of Auschwitz”, was a British soldier captured during World War II who rescued Jews from Auschwitz and smuggled himself into Auschwitz for one night, subsequently testifying about his experience at the Nuremberg Trials and the IG Farben Trial.

A panorama of Buna-Werke factory which belonged to IG Farben. Picture taken in 1945. (Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum Archives)

A panorama of Buna-Werke factory which belonged to IG Farben. Picture taken in 1945. (Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum Archives)

Picture taken during the visit of Heinrich Himmler in IG Farben factory in 1942. In the first row there are engineer Maximilian Faust and the Auschwitz commandant Rudolf Höss. Picture taken on July 18, 1942. (Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum Archives)

Picture taken during the visit of Heinrich Himmler in IG Farben factory in 1942. In the first row there are engineer Maximilian Faust and the Auschwitz commandant Rudolf Höss. Picture taken on July 18, 1942. (Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum Archives)

The IG Farben rubber and synthetic oil plant at Buna, or Auschwitz III. By the end of the war 80,000 slave labourers were employed here.

The IG Farben rubber and synthetic oil plant at Buna, or Auschwitz III. By the end of the war 80,000 slave labourers were employed here.

Picture taken during the visit of Heinrich Himmler in IG Farben factory in 1942. (Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum Archives)

Picture taken during the visit of Heinrich Himmler in IG Farben factory in 1942. (Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum Archives)

From 1925 to 1945 Fritz ter Meer was on the board of IG Farben AG. He was involved in the planning of Monowitz concentration camp, a satellite camp of KZ Auschwitz. Fritz ter Meer was sentenced to seven years in prison in the Nuremberg Trials in 1948. After he was released in 1951 he became supervisory board chairman (Aufsichtsratsvorsitzender) of Bayer AG.

From 1925 to 1945 Fritz ter Meer was on the board of IG Farben AG. He was involved in the planning of Monowitz concentration camp, a satellite camp of KZ Auschwitz. Fritz ter Meer was sentenced to seven years in prison in the Nuremberg Trials in 1948. After he was released in 1951 he became supervisory board chairman (Aufsichtsratsvorsitzender) of Bayer AG.

Auschwitz III Monowitz. IG Farben Industrie. Pic from collection of Mirosław Ganobis, Auschwitz Study Group member.

Auschwitz III Monowitz. IG Farben Industrie. Pic from collection of Mirosław Ganobis, Auschwitz Study Group member.

"Dr. Carl Hermann, a Quaker, has been a prisoner of the Nazis since May 5, 1943. He is a German, but anti-Nazi. He and his wife gave shelter to a Jewish family and listened to foreign broadcasts. Dr. Hermann is a physicist by profession and worked in a [IG Farben] near Berlin before he was taken prisoner by the Gestapo and placed in Halle Jail." Karl was taken to his lab every day to continue his work and brought back to prison at night.

"Dr. Carl Hermann, a Quaker, has been a prisoner of the Nazis since May 5, 1943. He is a German, but anti-Nazi. He and his wife gave shelter to a Jewish family and listened to foreign broadcasts. Dr. Hermann is a physicist by profession and worked in a [IG Farben] near Berlin before he was taken prisoner by the Gestapo and placed in Halle Jail." Karl was taken to his lab every day to continue his work and brought back to prison at night.

Auschwitz III Monowitz. IG Farben-Industrie. Pic from collection of Mirosław Ganobis, Auschwitz Study Group member.

Auschwitz III Monowitz. IG Farben-Industrie. Pic from collection of Mirosław Ganobis, Auschwitz Study Group member.

Hermann Schmitz (January 1, 1881– October 8, 1960) was a German industrialist and Nazi war criminal. CEO of IG Farben from 1935 to 1945, he was sentenced to four years in prison in the IG Farben Trial.

Hermann Schmitz (January 1, 1881– October 8, 1960) was a German industrialist and Nazi war criminal. CEO of IG Farben from 1935 to 1945, he was sentenced to four years in prison in the IG Farben Trial.

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