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تمّت ترجمة هذا الرسم المعلوماتي بالتعاون بين مشروع إدراك للترجمة (EdrakProject@) ومبادرة

تمّت ترجمة هذا الرسم المعلوماتي بالتعاون بين مشروع إدراك للترجمة (EdrakProject@) ومبادرة

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from Watch and Study

The Race To Sequence The Human Genome

Heart racing, palms sweating, labored breathing? No, you’re not having a heart attack -- it’s stage fright! If speaking in public makes you feel like you're fighting for your life, you're not alone...

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Online Education Kit: Understanding the Human Genome Project Welcome to the Online Education Kit. The links below contain all sections inside the CD. You can even download the individual multimedia portions of the CD to your computer.

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from WIRED

Circle of Life: The Beautiful New Way to Visualize Biological Data

Circle of Life: The Beautiful New Way to Visualize Biological Data by Martin Krzywinski. Clockwise from top right, the genomes of a human, a chimpanzee, a mouse and a zebrafish are arranged in a circle, with each color square corresponding to a pair of chromosomes. Lines connect similar DNA sequences, visually emphasizing just how much DNA we share with other species. Image: Martin Krzywinski/EMBO

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from Mail Online

The 'father of humanity' lived 239,000 years ago, claims genetic study

Humans' common father. Scientists now estimate his age to be 239,000 years old – a date closer to humanity's most common female ancestor who is believed to have lived 200,000 years ago.

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Oxford Nanopore announced a new pocket size device that can sequence an enitre human genome in only 15 minutes. Scientists say that if this works, it is truly a revolution. Other biotech companies are trying to stage a hostile takeover of the company. Sounds like the stuff of movies!

Newly released genome sequences from almost a dozen early human inhabitants of Europe suggest that the continent was once a melting pot in which brown-eyed farmers encountered blue-eyed hunter-gatherers.

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Humans Decoded........ Fast forward 16 years. With little public fanfare, geneticists have reached another super important milestone. While the human genome map gave us the ability to read all three billion letters of our genetic code, we now have the power to edit the human genome as well. Thanks in part to a chance discovery by researchers working to improve yogurt, scientists can now enter human cells, selectively snip out sections of code, and then incorporate new sequences

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