Harriet Tubman  Harriet Tubman was an African-American abolitionist, humanitarian, and Union spy during the American Civil War. Wikipedia  Born: 1820, Dorchester County  Died: March 10, 1913, Auburn  Full name: Araminta Harriet Ross  Nicknames: Moses, Minty  Children: Gertie Davies  Parents: Ben Ross, Harriet Greene

Harriet Tubman Harriet Tubman was an African-American abolitionist, humanitarian, and Union spy during the American Civil War. Wikipedia Born: 1820, Dorchester County Died: March 10, 1913, Auburn Full name: Araminta Harriet Ross Nicknames: Moses, Minty Children: Gertie Davies Parents: Ben Ross, Harriet Greene

Harriet Tubman was a runaway slave from Maryland who became known as the "Moses of her people."

Harriet Tubman was a runaway slave from Maryland who became known as the "Moses of her people."

Harriet Tubman - was an African-American abolitionist, humanitarian, and Union spy during the American Civil War. Born into slavery, Tubman escaped and subsequently made more than thirteen missions to rescue more than 70 slaves[1] using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. She later helped John Brown recruit men for his raid on Harpers Ferry, and in the post-war era struggled for women's suffrage. (Wikipedia)

Harriet Tubman - was an African-American abolitionist, humanitarian, and Union spy during the American Civil War. Born into slavery, Tubman escaped and subsequently made more than thirteen missions to rescue more than 70 slaves[1] using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. She later helped John Brown recruit men for his raid on Harpers Ferry, and in the post-war era struggled for women's suffrage. (Wikipedia)

New photo of Harriet Tubman surfaces, biographer calls it 'remarkable' - For decades, there have been few photographic images of Harriet Tubman depicting how the abolitionist and Civil War spy looked in her lifetime.

New photo of Harriet Tubman surfaces, biographer calls it 'remarkable' - For decades, there have been few photographic images of Harriet Tubman depicting how the abolitionist and Civil War spy looked in her lifetime.

Harriet Tubman  Underground Railroad Conductor and Women's Rights Advocate  Photograph of Harriet Tubman is labeled in the Library of Congress image as "nurse, spy and scout."

Women's Suffrage Picture Gallery

Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Conductor and Women's Rights Advocate Photograph of Harriet Tubman is labeled in the Library of Congress image as "nurse, spy and scout."

Harriet Tubman died of pneumonia on March 10, 1913. Before her death she told friends and family surrounding her death bed “I go to prepare a place for you”. Tubman was buried with military honors in the Auburn’s Fort Hill Cemetery. Her heirs were her niece, May Gaston; grandniece, Katy Steward and matron of the Harriet Tubman Home, Frances Smith. These three women inherited Tubman’s home and the seven acres surrounding it.

Harriet Tubman died of pneumonia on March 10, 1913. Before her death she told friends and family surrounding her death bed “I go to prepare a place for you”. Tubman was buried with military honors in the Auburn’s Fort Hill Cemetery. Her heirs were her niece, May Gaston; grandniece, Katy Steward and matron of the Harriet Tubman Home, Frances Smith. These three women inherited Tubman’s home and the seven acres surrounding it.

Harriet Tubman became famous as a "conductor" on the Underground Railroad during the turbulent 1850s. Born a slave on Maryland's eastern shore, she endured the harsh existence of a field hand, including brutal beatings. In 1849 she fled slavery, leaving her husband and family behind in order to escape. Despite a bounty on her head, she returned to the South at least 19 times to lead her family and hundreds of other slaves to freedom via the Underground Railroad.

Harriet Tubman became famous as a "conductor" on the Underground Railroad during the turbulent 1850s. Born a slave on Maryland's eastern shore, she endured the harsh existence of a field hand, including brutal beatings. In 1849 she fled slavery, leaving her husband and family behind in order to escape. Despite a bounty on her head, she returned to the South at least 19 times to lead her family and hundreds of other slaves to freedom via the Underground Railroad.

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