n-a-s-a: A map of our galaxy the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars

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A map of the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_Way

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This stellar swarm is M80 (NGC 6093), one of the densest of the 147 known globular star clusters in the Milky Way galaxy. Located about 28,000 light-years from Earth, M80 contains hundreds of thousands of stars, all held together by their mutual gravitational attraction. Globular clusters are particularly useful for studying stellar evolution, since all of the stars in the cluster have the same age (about 15 billion years), but cover a range of stellar masses.

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The Globular Cluster NGC 3201

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There is nothing to learn... some of us know that... Yes. In us... all the knowledge is available... Everything that has ever happened is present in this moment through vibration... or Frequencies... There is no past... no future... only this present moment... In this moment I can reach in... or out... and connect to all that is.

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The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observes the center of the globular cluster Messier 22, also known as M22.

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— Globular cluster M15 — This star cluster is known as M15 (Messier 15), and is located some 35 000 light-years away in the constellation of Pegasus (The Winged Horse). It is one of the oldest globular clusters known, with an age of around 12 billion years. - Image Credit: NASA, - Image enhancement: Jean-Baptiste Faure

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Globular Cluster NGC 6397 http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/star/2006/37/

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n-a-s-a: “ A map of our galaxy the Milky Way, showing pulsars (red), planetary nebulae (blue), globular clusters (yellow), and the orbits of several stars ”

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Hubble Sees an Ancient Globular Cluster This image captures the stunning NGC 6535, a globular cluster 22,000 light-years away in the constellation of Serpens (The Serpent) that measures one light-year across.

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