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The Strangest Exoplanet Ever To read the full article, see: http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/the-strangest-exoplanet-ever/

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35 Astounding And Uplifting Facts About The Universe

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Gliese 436 b // Click through to read about this planet. It has hot ice. Space is so fracking cool.

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6 Real Planets That Put Science Fiction to Shame

try to pretend you are Han Solo (ladies, Princess Leia). You are in the rebel base on the planet Hoth, and every inch of the entire planet is covered in ice. What you are picturing is close to the actual Gliese 436 b. Except it's so close to its star that it stays at 800 degrees Fahrenheit on the surface. But Gliese The gravity on the planet is so powerful that it compresses all of the water vapor in the atmosphere and pushes it together into a solid, forming an "ice ten."

So dig this, and it's 33 light years away! ~ETS (Gliese 436 b is a Neptune-sized exoplanet located about 33 light-years away in the constellation Leo. Astronomers believe that it embodies exotic states of water that causes its surface to be covered in burning ice. The pressure on the planet forces the ice to stay solid, but the extreme surface temperature of 570° F (300° C) superheats the water, causing it to come off as steam. - Unbelievable Facts About Our Universe | IFLScience.)

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Far away in the Gliese star system is a Neptune-sized planet called Gliese 436 b. This world is covered in ice that burns constantly at 822.2˚ Fahrenheit (439˚ C). The reason why the water doesn’t liquify and then turn into steam is due to the massive gravity of the planet - it exerts so much force on the water that the atoms are bound tightly together as a solid: burning ice.

This artist's concept shows the enormous comet-like cloud of hydrogen bleeding off of the warm, Neptune-sized planet Gliese 436b just 30 light-years from Earth. Also depicted is the parent star, which is a faint red dwarf named Gliese 436. The hydrogen is evaporating from the planet due to extreme radiation from the star. A phenomenon this large has never before been seen around any exoplanet. Image credit: NASA, ESA, STScI, and G. Bacon.

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The Neptune-sized planet orbits a cooler, less luminous red-dwarf star (dubbed Gliese 436), completing one full orbit in just 2 days and 15....

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The exoplanet Gliese 436b trails a gigantic cloud of hydrogen, a comet-like tail that's bigger even than the planet's star. Gliese 436b is the smallest planet with such a tail that we've seen.

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The graphic shows the polar view of planet Gliese 436b around its host star. The long, comet-like tail resulting from the atmosphere getting ripped off it is shown as well. The exoplanet resides about 4 million kilometers from its star and orbits it in just 2.6 Earth days. - Credit: NASA, ESA

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Orbit of Gliese 436b around its host star

GJ436interior - Possible interior structure of Gliese 436 b - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

PIA19345-HeliumAtmosphereFormation-20150611 - Gliese 436 b - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hubble dévoile GJ 436b, l’exoplanète qui ressemble à une comète

Illustration de GJ 436b et de son long nuage de gaz. Le rayonnement de l’étoile hôte (Gliese 436) décape lentement l’atmosphère de cette Neptune chaude située à seulement 30 années-lumière de nous. © Nasa, Esa, G. Bacon (STScI)

6 Real Planets That Put Science Fiction to Shame

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Hubble Space Telescope astronomers discovered an immense cloud of hydrogen bleeding from a planet (GJ 436b) orbiting less than 2 million miles from a nearby star. Orbiting it in just 2.6 Earth days. Hydrogen is evaporating from a warm, Neptune-sized planet, due to extreme radiation from the star. Observing this phenomenon may offer clues to how other planets with hydrogen-enveloped atmospheres could have their outer layers evaporated by their parent star, leaving behind solid, rocky cores.

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Artist impression of Gliese 436b | ESA/Hubble