Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas

Camisards were Huguenots (French Protestants) of the rugged and isolated Cévennes region, and the Vaunage in southern France. They raised an insurrection against the persecutions which followed the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, which had made being Protestant illegal. The Camisards operated throughout the mainly protestant Cévennes region which in the eighteenth century also included the Vaunage and the parts of the Camargue around Aigues Mortes. The revolt by the Camisards see…

Malacca & Piqué-Work Cane | Walpole Antiques. This type of piqué cane is English and from the period around 1700, the technique being brought to England by Huguenots fleeing France after Louis XIV imposed his Edict of Nantes in 1665. The remarkably short span of time in which they were produced, (the earliest so far recorded as 1687; the latest 1717) as well as an evidently common style strongly suggests that they were all made in one workshop.

pin 1

Nantes, a city in West France, located on the Loire River, is the 6th largest in France. During the Wars of Religion, Nantes supported the Catholic League and the governor of Brittany, the Duke of Mercoeur, in his fight against the Protestants. The town was one of the last to recognise the authority of Henri IV, which meant that the edict of Nantes, a decree guaranteeing the right of worship to Protestants, did not reflect the majority opinion of the inhabitants.

pin 92
heart 7

The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. In the Edict, Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity.[1] The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance.

pin 27
heart 1

Persecution of the French Huguenots (After the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV in 1685) 1904 Maurice Leloir (1853-1940 French) Color lithograph.

pin 24
heart 3

One feature of the Huguenot movement in France was that it included an extremely large proportion of artisans and craftsmen. This worked do France's disadvantage when Huguenots were forced out of the country before and after the 1685 Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (ie., Huguenot Diaspora). But it was to the advantage of the rest of the world wherever Huguenots settled and brought their talents and skills

pin 108
heart 5

A Hetalia Diaries entry by Kita Inoru: "For those who know me mostly as a promoter of all things Canadian, my interest in the history of the Huguenots might come a bit out of left wing. But this entry is based on the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in France in 1685 and the subsequent flood of French Protestant ("Huguenot") immigrants coming to England to seek religious freedom."

pin 30
heart 11

The Edict of Nantes, signed by Henry IV in April, 1598, ended the Wars of Religion, and allowed the Huguenots some religious freedoms, including free exercise of their religion in 20 specified towns of France. The Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV in October, 1685, began anew persecution of the Huguenots, and hundreds of thousands of Huguenots fled France to other countries.

pin 17
heart 1

About 200,000 Huguenots left France, settling in non-Catholic Europe - the Netherlands, Germany, especially Prussia, Switzerland, Scandinavia, and even as far as Russia where Huguenot craftsmen could find customers at the court of the Czars. The Dutch East India Company sent a few hundred to the Cape to develop the vineyards in southern Africa. About 50,000 came to England, perhaps about 10,000 moving on to Ireland. So there are many inhabitants of these islands who have Huguenot blood.

pin 92
heart 7

The Edict of Nantes issued by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. In the Edict, Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity.The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance. Henry's grandson, Louis XIV, annulated it.

pin 4
heart 3