The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. In the Edict, Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity.[1] The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance.

The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. In the Edict, Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity.[1] The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance.

Nantes, a city in West France, located on the Loire River, is the 6th largest in France. During the Wars of Religion, Nantes supported the Catholic League and the governor of Brittany, the Duke of Mercoeur, in his fight against the Protestants. The town was one of the last to recognise the authority of Henri IV, which meant that the edict of Nantes, a decree guaranteeing the right of worship to Protestants, did not reflect the majority opinion of the inhabitants.

Nantes, a city in West France, located on the Loire River, is the 6th largest in France. During the Wars of Religion, Nantes supported the Catholic League and the governor of Brittany, the Duke of Mercoeur, in his fight against the Protestants. The town was one of the last to recognise the authority of Henri IV, which meant that the edict of Nantes, a decree guaranteeing the right of worship to Protestants, did not reflect the majority opinion of the inhabitants.

In 1685 draaide Lodewijk XIV het Edict van Nantes terug. Waarin stond dat de protestanten vrij hun godsdienst mochten beoefenen. Dat hield dus in dat de hugenoten zich moesten bekeren of vertrekken, veel vertrokken er naar de Republiek toe waar al veel protestanten woonden. Ook was er geen koning en dus geen absolutisme.

In 1685 draaide Lodewijk XIV het Edict van Nantes terug. Waarin stond dat de protestanten vrij hun godsdienst mochten beoefenen. Dat hield dus in dat de hugenoten zich moesten bekeren of vertrekken, veel vertrokken er naar de Republiek toe waar al veel protestanten woonden. Ook was er geen koning en dus geen absolutisme.

Edict of Nantes (1598): Henry IV gave rights to Protestant Huguenots in France, equalizing them with Catholics for the first time in French history. TJ - 15-16th Century - IS

Edict of Nantes (1598): Henry IV gave rights to Protestant Huguenots in France, equalizing them with Catholics for the first time in French history. TJ - 15-16th Century - IS

Louix XIV's revocation of the Edict of Nantes signified shifting religious struggles and resulted in the Huguenots in France losing their ability to freely worship. MD - 17th c. IS

Louix XIV's revocation of the Edict of Nantes signified shifting religious struggles and resulted in the Huguenots in France losing their ability to freely worship. MD - 17th c. IS

Huguenot stamp~my Ancestors.  Andre Picon & Ester Jeanne Bonneau left La Rochelle, France during the Edict of Nantes.  Arriving in Scotland then to Ireland. Andre Picon held a position in the Court of King Louis XIV (King of France) : Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

Huguenot stamp~my Ancestors. Andre Picon & Ester Jeanne Bonneau left La Rochelle, France during the Edict of Nantes. Arriving in Scotland then to Ireland. Andre Picon held a position in the Court of King Louis XIV (King of France) : Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

Pierre Chastain, Huguenot, My 8th Great-Grandfather.  Pierre Chastain was born in 1659 near the village of Charost in central France. His parents were Estienne and Jeanne (Laurent) Chastain.  After King Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685, Pierre, his wife Susanne (Renaud), and their five children fled France, eventually settling in England.  From there,  Pierre helped gather a group of Huguenots to colonize Virginia.

Pierre Chastain, Huguenot, My 8th Great-Grandfather. Pierre Chastain was born in 1659 near the village of Charost in central France. His parents were Estienne and Jeanne (Laurent) Chastain. After King Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685, Pierre, his wife Susanne (Renaud), and their five children fled France, eventually settling in England. From there, Pierre helped gather a group of Huguenots to colonize Virginia.

The Edict of Nantes (French: Édit de Nantes), issued probably on 30 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic.

The Edict of Nantes (French: Édit de Nantes), issued probably on 30 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic.

Louis XIV revoking the Edict of Nantes

Louis XIV revoking the Edict of Nantes

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