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Nantes, a city in West France, located on the Loire River, is the 6th largest in France. During the Wars of Religion, Nantes supported the Catholic League and the governor of Brittany, the Duke of Mercoeur, in his fight against the Protestants. The town was one of the last to recognise the authority of Henri IV, which meant that the edict of Nantes, a decree guaranteeing the right of worship to Protestants, did not reflect the majority opinion of the inhabitants.

The Fugitives, French Huguenots This could have been my ancestors. Our family history is a father and son came to America after the Edict of Nantes was revoked. The father left his son on Long Island, returned to France. The father was never heard from again but the son went on to become the patriarch of an American family.

The Edict of Nantes, issued on 13 April 1598, by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. In the Edict, Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity.[1] The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance.

The "Dragonnades" were a French government policy instituted by Louis XIV in 1681 to intimidate Huguenot families into either leaving France or re-converting to Catholicism. This involved the billeting of ill-disciplined dragoons in Protestant households with implied permission to abuse the inhabitants and destroy or steal their possessions. The soldiers employed in this role were satirized as "missionary dragoons"

Pierre Chastain, Huguenot, My 8th Great-Grandfather. Pierre Chastain was born in 1659 near the village of Charost in central France. His parents were Estienne and Jeanne (Laurent) Chastain. After King Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes in 1685, Pierre, his wife Susanne (Renaud), and their five children fled France, eventually settling in England. From there, Pierre helped gather a group of Huguenots to colonize Virginia.

One feature of the Huguenot movement in France was that it included an extremely large proportion of artisans and craftsmen. This worked do France's disadvantage when Huguenots were forced out of the country before and after the 1685 Revocation of the Edict of Nantes (ie., Huguenot Diaspora). But it was to the advantage of the rest of the world wherever Huguenots settled and brought their talents and skills

Henri IV (1553 - 1610). King of France from 1589 to 1610. He married Margaret of Valois, but annulled in marriage. He then remarried Marie de Medici and had six children. He had many mistresses during his life. He was a protestant, and had to fight a civil war in order to get the throne. He finally decided that "Paris is worth a mass", and converted to Catholicism to gain the crown. He was assassinated in 1610.

A Hetalia Diaries entry by Kita Inoru: "For those who know me mostly as a promoter of all things Canadian, my interest in the history of the Huguenots might come a bit out of left wing. But this entry is based on the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes in France in 1685 and the subsequent flood of French Protestant ("Huguenot") immigrants coming to England to seek religious freedom."

The Edict of Nantes issued by Henry IV of France, granted the Calvinist Protestants of France (also known as Huguenots) substantial rights in a nation still considered essentially Catholic. In the Edict, Henry aimed primarily to promote civil unity.The Edict separated civil from religious unity, treated some Protestants for the first time as more than mere schismatics and heretics, and opened a path for secularism and tolerance. Henry's grandson, Louis XIV, annulated it.