William the Conqueror commissioned the Domesday Book, which recorded the first English census (Dec. 1085 to Aug. 1086).  The grand and comprehensive scale on which the Domesday survey took place, and the irreversible nature of the information collected, led people to compare it to the Last Judgement, or 'Doomsday', described in the Bible. It was written by an observer of the survey that "there was no single hide nor a yard of land, nor indeed one ox nor one cow nor one pig which was left…

William the Conqueror commissioned the Domesday Book, which recorded the first English census (Dec. 1085 to Aug. 1086). The grand and comprehensive scale on which the Domesday survey took place, and the irreversible nature of the information collected, led people to compare it to the Last Judgement, or 'Doomsday', described in the Bible. It was written by an observer of the survey that "there was no single hide nor a yard of land, nor indeed one ox nor one cow nor one pig which was left…

December 25, 1085: William the Conqueror orders compilation of The Domesday Book. It recorded the land, livestock, and taxable assets of all of England -- a remarkable achievement for the time. It was called the Domesday Book because whatever it said was the Law, and there was no appeal. "That is why we have called the book 'the Book of Judgment' ... because its decisions, like those of Last Judgment, are unalterable."

December 25, 1085: William the Conqueror orders compilation of The Domesday Book. It recorded the land, livestock, and taxable assets of all of England -- a remarkable achievement for the time. It was called the Domesday Book because whatever it said was the Law, and there was no appeal. "That is why we have called the book 'the Book of Judgment' ... because its decisions, like those of Last Judgment, are unalterable."

Domesday Book is a detailed survey of the land held by William the Conqueror and his people, the earliest surviving public record, and a hugely important historical resource.

Domesday Book is a detailed survey of the land held by William the Conqueror and his people, the earliest surviving public record, and a hugely important historical resource.

Diagram of the social structure of Anglo-Norman England as revealed by the Domesday Book

Diagram of the social structure of Anglo-Norman England as revealed by the Domesday Book

Plunder the ancient 1085 British Domesday book online at http://domesdaymap.co.uk/  An early accounting of people and property available to tax for William the Conquerer.  Art from Domesday-book-1804x972.jpg

Plunder the ancient 1085 British Domesday book online at http://domesdaymap.co.uk/ An early accounting of people and property available to tax for William the Conquerer. Art from Domesday-book-1804x972.jpg

Fowlmere | Domesday Book

Fowlmere | Domesday Book

Kentwell Hall, is a moated manor house in Long Melford, Suffolk. Most of the current building facade dates from the mid 16th century, but the origins of Kentwell are much earlier, with references in the Domesday Book of 1086.

Kentwell Hall, is a moated manor house in Long Melford, Suffolk. Most of the current building facade dates from the mid 16th century, but the origins of Kentwell are much earlier, with references in the Domesday Book of 1086.

The Day of Judgement or ‘Doomsday’ after which Domesday Book may have been named. From a late 13th-century psalter BL Additional MS 38116 f.1v; permission British Library

The Day of Judgement or ‘Doomsday’ after which Domesday Book may have been named. From a late 13th-century psalter BL Additional MS 38116 f.1v; permission British Library

HIC ANNOTANTUR TENENTES TERRAS IN DEVENESCIRE ("Here are noted (those) holding lands in Devonshire"). Detail from Domesday Book, list forming part of first page of king's holdings. There are 53 entries, including the first entry for the king himself followed by the Devon Domesday Book tenants-in-chief. Each name has its own chapter to follow.

HIC ANNOTANTUR TENENTES TERRAS IN DEVENESCIRE ("Here are noted (those) holding lands in Devonshire"). Detail from Domesday Book, list forming part of first page of king's holdings. There are 53 entries, including the first entry for the king himself followed by the Devon Domesday Book tenants-in-chief. Each name has its own chapter to follow.

Tichfield Mill- Tichfield  There has been a Water Mill on this site since the time of the Domesday Book. Now converted into a pub and restaurant. Some of the machinery is still in the building. The water is due to the recent heavy rains.

Tichfield Mill- Tichfield There has been a Water Mill on this site since the time of the Domesday Book. Now converted into a pub and restaurant. Some of the machinery is still in the building. The water is due to the recent heavy rains.

King William I The Conqueror (1066-1087). House of Normandy. 25th great-grandfather to Queen Elizabeth II. In 1072 William led an invasion that forced King Malcolm of Scotland to surrender hostages and swear fealty. Completed the establishment of feudalism in England, compiling detailed records of land and property in the Domesday Book and kept the barons firmly under control. Died in Rouen after a fall from his horse and is buried in Caen, France. He was succeeded by his son William II.

King William I The Conqueror (1066-1087). House of Normandy. 25th great-grandfather to Queen Elizabeth II. In 1072 William led an invasion that forced King Malcolm of Scotland to surrender hostages and swear fealty. Completed the establishment of feudalism in England, compiling detailed records of land and property in the Domesday Book and kept the barons firmly under control. Died in Rouen after a fall from his horse and is buried in Caen, France. He was succeeded by his son William II.

A page of the Domesday Book for Wiltshire, with the landowners listed in the left column

A page of the Domesday Book for Wiltshire, with the landowners listed in the left column

Leeds Castle, or better to say, The Castle of Queens, as its history closely tied with Queens of England. The castle is known since the 9th century and is still called after the name of its founder and first owner, Lid and Lidian. The facts about Leeds Castle were written in Domesday Book. In different eras the castle belonged to Eleanor of Castile, Marguerite de France, Isabella de France, Katherine of Aragon. Future Elizabeth I was hold there in a prison.

Leeds Castle, or better to say, The Castle of Queens, as its history closely tied with Queens of England. The castle is known since the 9th century and is still called after the name of its founder and first owner, Lid and Lidian. The facts about Leeds Castle were written in Domesday Book. In different eras the castle belonged to Eleanor of Castile, Marguerite de France, Isabella de France, Katherine of Aragon. Future Elizabeth I was hold there in a prison.

Luton Hoo is an English country house and estate between the towns of Luton, Bedfordshire and Harpenden, Hertfordshire. Most of the estate lies within the civil parish of Hyde, Bedfordshire. The unusual name "Hoo" is a Saxon word meaning the spur of a hill, and is more commonly associated with East Anglia. Luton Hoo is not mentioned in the Domesday book, but a family called de Hoo occupied a manor house on the site for four centuries, until the death of Lord Thomas Hoo in 1455.

Luton Hoo is an English country house and estate between the towns of Luton, Bedfordshire and Harpenden, Hertfordshire. Most of the estate lies within the civil parish of Hyde, Bedfordshire. The unusual name "Hoo" is a Saxon word meaning the spur of a hill, and is more commonly associated with East Anglia. Luton Hoo is not mentioned in the Domesday book, but a family called de Hoo occupied a manor house on the site for four centuries, until the death of Lord Thomas Hoo in 1455.

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