Battleships at anchor on battleship row in Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. USS Nevada  USS Oklahoma * USS Pennsylvania  USS Arizona * USS Tennessee USS California * USS Maryland USS West Virginia * *Sunk or destroyed

Battleships at anchor on battleship row in Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. USS Nevada USS Oklahoma * USS Pennsylvania USS Arizona * USS Tennessee USS California * USS Maryland USS West Virginia * *Sunk or destroyed

The USS Oklahoma is pulled upright after capsizing due to damage during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor Dec 7, 1941. It was an amazing feat never before tried. 21 massive GE DC motors were anchored to the shore and cables strung to the ship. It took three months to pull the ship upright. It was beached, patched up and sold for scrap, but while being towed to the US, it developed a leak. Despite the efforts of the salvors, the ship settled and finally, after many hours, rolled over and…

The USS Oklahoma is pulled upright after capsizing due to damage during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor Dec 7, 1941. It was an amazing feat never before tried. 21 massive GE DC motors were anchored to the shore and cables strung to the ship. It took three months to pull the ship upright. It was beached, patched up and sold for scrap, but while being towed to the US, it developed a leak. Despite the efforts of the salvors, the ship settled and finally, after many hours, rolled over and…

t's never too late to solve a mystery, or to set the record straight. In the 70 years since the attack on Pearl Harbor, a dramatic photo of female firefighters has been published many times in magazines, history books and online as a depiction of action on Dec. 7, 1941. We published it this past week on msnbc.com. Now, with the help of our readers, we've located one of the women, who says the photo was definitely not taken on that day.

t's never too late to solve a mystery, or to set the record straight. In the 70 years since the attack on Pearl Harbor, a dramatic photo of female firefighters has been published many times in magazines, history books and online as a depiction of action on Dec. 7, 1941. We published it this past week on msnbc.com. Now, with the help of our readers, we've located one of the women, who says the photo was definitely not taken on that day.

At 7:55am, Sunday, Dec 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor is attacked by carrier      based Japanese planes, killing 2300. The following day in his war speech to Congress, President Franklin Roosevelt called it "a day which will live in infamy."

At 7:55am, Sunday, Dec 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor is attacked by carrier based Japanese planes, killing 2300. The following day in his war speech to Congress, President Franklin Roosevelt called it "a day which will live in infamy."

Attack on Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941. Damage left by Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941.

Attack on Pearl Harbor December 7, 1941. Damage left by Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941.

Dec. 7, 1941, 22-yr-old Cornelia Fort became the 1st American woman pilot in a combat zone while flying over Pearl Harbor when the Japanese attacked. While 2 other civilian planes were shot out of the sky, she made it thru' the strafing & landed her plane. She was among the first pilots recruited for the Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron. In March 1943, she was killed by a midair collision while on a ferrying mission to Dallas.

Dec. 7, 1941, 22-yr-old Cornelia Fort became the 1st American woman pilot in a combat zone while flying over Pearl Harbor when the Japanese attacked. While 2 other civilian planes were shot out of the sky, she made it thru' the strafing & landed her plane. She was among the first pilots recruited for the Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron. In March 1943, she was killed by a midair collision while on a ferrying mission to Dallas.

A staff sergeant and his wife find each other after the horror of the Pearl Harbor attack on Dec. 7, 1941. This photo appeared in the Dec. 19, 1941, edition of LIFE magazine.

A staff sergeant and his wife find each other after the horror of the Pearl Harbor attack on Dec. 7, 1941. This photo appeared in the Dec. 19, 1941, edition of LIFE magazine.

U.S. Army Private Richard Schimmel was 19 and just learning how radar worked when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. He and some of his Signal Corps colleagues were the first to know the planes were coming … but a warning they extended was ignored. Here is their story ... told through his eyes ... 75 years later.

U.S. Army Private Richard Schimmel was 19 and just learning how radar worked when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. He and some of his Signal Corps colleagues were the first to know the planes were coming … but a warning they extended was ignored. Here is their story ... told through his eyes ... 75 years later.

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