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David Bowie, 'Aladdin Sane' (aka 'Ziggy Goes to Amerika') 1973 - perhaps one of "the strange ones in the dome"? (Endless Seas) (via funkybunch | Album Covers)

Confused: Intergalactic

David Bowie, 'Aladdin Sane' (aka 'Ziggy Goes to Amerika') 1973 - perhaps one of "the strange ones in the dome"? (Endless Seas) (via funkybunch | Album Covers)

David Bowie Albums - sans The Laughing Gnome, Baal, Tin Machine, Tin Machine II and Toy. I'd throw the Davy Jones & the Lower Third, the Manish Boys, and the 1966 Pye Singles in there, too, for the sake of completeness.

David Bowie Albums - sans The Laughing Gnome, Baal, Tin Machine, Tin Machine II and Toy. I'd throw the Davy Jones & the Lower Third, the Manish Boys, and the 1966 Pye Singles in there, too, for the sake of completeness.

David Bowie - Blackstar. Amazing, thought provoking, poignant album. We will miss his genius

David Bowie - Blackstar. Amazing, thought provoking, poignant album. We will miss his genius

Heroes by David Bowie (1977) | 42 Classic Black And White Album Covers  "just for one day"

Farewell, Angelina by Joan Baez (1965)

Heroes by David Bowie (1977) | 42 Classic Black And White Album Covers "just for one day"

On 'The Next Day,' David Bowie broods over the places he's gone and the faces he's seen, but he's resolutely aimed at the future.

The Next Day

On 'The Next Day,' David Bowie broods over the places he's gone and the faces he's seen, but he's resolutely aimed at the future.

1973 Album cover shoot for Aladdin Sane, photographed by Brian Duffy. The lightning bolt represented the duality of the mind, although Bowie later explained that the "lad insane" of the album's title track was inspired by his brother Terry, who was diagnosed as a schizophrenic. Photo By Brian Duffy

David Bowie Style File

1973 Album cover shoot for Aladdin Sane, photographed by Brian Duffy. The lightning bolt represented the duality of the mind, although Bowie later explained that the "lad insane" of the album's title track was inspired by his brother Terry, who was diagnosed as a schizophrenic. Photo By Brian Duffy

Readers' Poll: The Best David Bowie Albums Pictures - 5. 'Diamond Dogs' | Rolling Stone

Readers' Poll: The Best David Bowie Albums

Readers' Poll: The Best David Bowie Albums Pictures - 5. 'Diamond Dogs' | Rolling Stone

Readers' Poll: The Best David Bowie Albums Pictures - 7. 'Scary Monsters' | Rolling Stone

Readers' Poll: The Best David Bowie Albums

David Bowie, the man who sold the world Album Cover

David Bowie, the man who sold the world Album Cover

Drowned in Sound's Favourite Albums of 2016 /Blackstar/an atmospheric, eerie, jazz-tinted prog, cradled in the sort of skittering electronic beats

Drowned in Sound's 16 Favourite Albums of 2016

Drowned in Sound's Favourite Albums of 2016 /Blackstar/an atmospheric, eerie, jazz-tinted prog, cradled in the sort of skittering electronic beats

David Bowie and Twiggy on the original album cover of Pin Ups (1973)

David Bowie and Twiggy on the original album cover of Pin Ups (1973)

Cover art for The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. His acoustic versions were my favorite music of, oh, 2002.

Cover art for The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars. His acoustic versions were my favorite music of, oh, 2002.

Hunky Dory, David Bowie - Bowie, then twenty-four, arrived at the Hunky Dory cover shoot with a Marlene Dietrich photo book: a perfect metaphor for this album's visionary blend of gay camp, flashy rock guitar and saloon-piano balladry. Bowie marked the polar ends of his artistic ambitions in tribute songs to Bob Dylan and Andy Warhol; in songs such as "Oh! You Pretty Things" and "Changes," he shows that he is already his own man, with a new sound that seems just as modern today as it was…

Hunky Dory, David Bowie - Bowie, then twenty-four, arrived at the Hunky Dory cover shoot with a Marlene Dietrich photo book: a perfect metaphor for this album's visionary blend of gay camp, flashy rock guitar and saloon-piano balladry. Bowie marked the polar ends of his artistic ambitions in tribute songs to Bob Dylan and Andy Warhol; in songs such as "Oh! You Pretty Things" and "Changes," he shows that he is already his own man, with a new sound that seems just as modern today as it was…

David Bowie, 'Let's Dance' is #83 on Rolling Stone's 100 Best Albums of the 80s.

David Bowie, 'Let's Dance' is #83 on Rolling Stone's 100 Best Albums of the 80s.