Martin Luther King and Malcolm X only met once, on March 26, 1964 when both were attending Senate hearings for the Civil Rights Bill. #TodayInBlackHistory

Martin Luther King and Malcolm X only met once, on March 26, 1964 when both were attending Senate hearings for the Civil Rights Bill. #TodayInBlackHistory

Born enslaved in 1847, John Roy Lynch eventually served as a U.S. Congressman from Mississippi from 1873 to 1877 and 1882-1883. Prior to his term in Congress he had served as Speaker of the Mississippi House of Representatives. An active Republican, Lynch served in various Party capacities in Mississippi and Washington, D.C. until 1911. In 1912, he moved to Chicago where he practiced law until his death in 1939. The speech in the link is “Speech on the Civil Rights Bill” from 1875.

Born enslaved in 1847, John Roy Lynch eventually served as a U.S. Congressman from Mississippi from 1873 to 1877 and 1882-1883. Prior to his term in Congress he had served as Speaker of the Mississippi House of Representatives. An active Republican, Lynch served in various Party capacities in Mississippi and Washington, D.C. until 1911. In 1912, he moved to Chicago where he practiced law until his death in 1939. The speech in the link is “Speech on the Civil Rights Bill” from 1875.

nice LGBT leaders, civil rights attorneys make case for LGBT-inclusive civil rights bill - Georgia Voice Check more at https://epeak.info/2017/02/22/lgbt-leaders-civil-rights-attorneys-make-case-for-lgbt-inclusive-civil-rights-bill-georgia-voice/

nice LGBT leaders, civil rights attorneys make case for LGBT-inclusive civil rights bill - Georgia Voice Check more at https://epeak.info/2017/02/22/lgbt-leaders-civil-rights-attorneys-make-case-for-lgbt-inclusive-civil-rights-bill-georgia-voice/

John Lewis, a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee who had planned to call the civil rights bill "too little, too late" at the 1963 March on Washington, shown on April 16, 1964. Photo by Marion S. Trikosko, U.S. News and World Report.

John Lewis, a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee who had planned to call the civil rights bill "too little, too late" at the 1963 March on Washington, shown on April 16, 1964. Photo by Marion S. Trikosko, U.S. News and World Report.

Why HRC Supports A Comprehensive LGBT Civil Rights Bill

Why HRC Supports A Comprehensive LGBT Civil Rights Bill

"At the end of the day, full federal equality is the only acceptable option, nothing more, nothing less," the head of the Human Rights...

On June 19, 1964 the US Senate passed the Civil Rights Bill by a vote of 73-27 after 54 working days of filibuster since it was introduced in March. This was the first time the Senate had invoked cloture since 1927. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the bill two weeks later on July 2, 1964. #TodayInBlackHistory

On June 19, 1964 the US Senate passed the Civil Rights Bill by a vote of 73-27 after 54 working days of filibuster since it was introduced in March. This was the first time the Senate had invoked cloture since 1927. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the bill two weeks later on July 2, 1964. #TodayInBlackHistory

Voter Fraud Continued Republicans Fought for Equal Rights for Blacks and Passed Civil Rights Bills While Democrats Blocked Equality Efforts

Voter Fraud Continued Republicans Fought for Equal Rights for Blacks and Passed Civil Rights Bills While Democrats Blocked Equality Efforts

The 1964 Civil Rights Bill Explained in 8 Minutes - YouTube

The 1964 Civil Rights Bill Explained in 8 Minutes - YouTube

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