On July 2, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson  signed a historic Civil Rights Bill against segregation in a nationally televised ceremony.

On July 2, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed a historic Civil Rights Bill against segregation in a nationally televised ceremony.

J.B. Stoner, segregationist, addresses crowd of whites at slave market, St. Augustine, Florida, 1964 (Sign reads Kill Civil Rights Bill) #History #UnitedStatesHistory #BlackHistory #Racism #JimCrow #Segregation #1960s

J.B. Stoner, segregationist, addresses crowd of whites at slave market, St. Augustine, Florida, 1964 (Sign reads Kill Civil Rights Bill) #History #UnitedStatesHistory #BlackHistory #Racism #JimCrow #Segregation #1960s

On June 19, 1964 the US Senate passed the Civil Rights Bill by a vote of 73-27 after 54 working days of filibuster since it was introduced in March. This was the first time the Senate had invoked cloture since 1927. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the bill two weeks later on July 2, 1964. #TodayInBlackHistory

On June 19, 1964 the US Senate passed the Civil Rights Bill by a vote of 73-27 after 54 working days of filibuster since it was introduced in March. This was the first time the Senate had invoked cloture since 1927. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the bill two weeks later on July 2, 1964. #TodayInBlackHistory

John Lewis, a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee who had planned to call the civil rights bill "too little, too late" at the 1963 March on Washington, shown on April 16, 1964. Photo by Marion S. Trikosko, U.S. News and World Report.

John Lewis, a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee who had planned to call the civil rights bill "too little, too late" at the 1963 March on Washington, shown on April 16, 1964. Photo by Marion S. Trikosko, U.S. News and World Report.

Born enslaved in 1847, John Roy Lynch eventually served as a U.S. Congressman from Mississippi from 1873 to 1877 and 1882-1883. Prior to his term in Congress he had served as Speaker of the Mississippi House of Representatives. An active Republican, Lynch served in various Party capacities in Mississippi and Washington, D.C. until 1911. In 1912, he moved to Chicago where he practiced law until his death in 1939. The speech in the link is “Speech on the Civil Rights Bill” from 1875.

Born enslaved in 1847, John Roy Lynch eventually served as a U.S. Congressman from Mississippi from 1873 to 1877 and 1882-1883. Prior to his term in Congress he had served as Speaker of the Mississippi House of Representatives. An active Republican, Lynch served in various Party capacities in Mississippi and Washington, D.C. until 1911. In 1912, he moved to Chicago where he practiced law until his death in 1939. The speech in the link is “Speech on the Civil Rights Bill” from 1875.

During those twenty years Lyndon Johnson had never supported civil rights legislation—any civil rights legislation. In Senate and House alike, his record was an unbroken one of votes against every civil rights bill that had ever come to a vote: against voting rights bills; against bills that would have struck at job discrimination and at segregation in other areas of American life; even against bills that would have protected blacks from lynching.

During those twenty years Lyndon Johnson had never supported civil rights legislation—any civil rights legislation. In Senate and House alike, his record was an unbroken one of votes against every civil rights bill that had ever come to a vote: against voting rights bills; against bills that would have struck at job discrimination and at segregation in other areas of American life; even against bills that would have protected blacks from lynching.

Naomi and Wash were both experienced prejudice.  They looked down upon by the white authorities and community members.

Civil Rights Background Study - Paired Fiction and Poetry

Naomi and Wash were both experienced prejudice. They looked down upon by the white authorities and community members.

Martin Luther King and Malcolm X only met once, on March 26, 1964 when both were attending Senate hearings for the Civil Rights Bill. #TodayInBlackHistory

Martin Luther King and Malcolm X only met once, on March 26, 1964 when both were attending Senate hearings for the Civil Rights Bill. #TodayInBlackHistory

abraham lincoln gettysburg address images | Bill of Rights Institute: Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address ...Nov. 19, 1863.

Gettysburg Address

abraham lincoln gettysburg address images | Bill of Rights Institute: Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address ...Nov. 19, 1863.

The other side of History. It is a shame that people were against the Civil Rights Bill  civil rights act, Protest

The other side of History. It is a shame that people were against the Civil Rights Bill civil rights act, Protest

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