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Over ninety years ago during World War I, British and German soldiers put down their weapons, walked out into the desolation of No-Man’s Land and shook hands. This was the Christmas cease fire of 1914.        In a moment unique to the First World War, troops were given a moment of respite from the horrors of the war when soldiers exchanged gifts, looked at each others’ family photographs and played friendly games of football with the enemy.

During the Christmas Truce of German and British soldiers play a game of soccer in the “no man’s land” between trenches. Not an actual photo from the event, but you get the picture.

Beautiful true Christmas story...Exactly a century ago, the men in the trenches ( World War I) heard something unusual: singing...

Silent Night: The Story of the World War I Christmas Truce of 1914

"British and German Soldiers Arm-in-Arm Exchanging Headgear: A Christmas Truce between Opposing Trenches," taken from from the Illustrated London News of January 1915

​The World War I Christmas truce - CBS News

​The World War I Christmas truce

The story of a Yuletide football match between British and German troops on the frontlines of battle is so good, it's still being told, embellished and re-lived 100 years later

WW1 Christmas Truce

'We no shoot': The spontaneous Christmas truce of WWI

Christmas Truce WWI/In this image provided by the Imperial War Museum, World War I German and British soldiers stand tog.

WWI British and German soldiers exchange cigarettes, gifts, and addresses during Christmas Truce, 1914

WWI British and German soldiers exchange cigarettes, gifts, and addresses during Christmas Truce, 1914 [361x400]

WWI British and German soldiers exchange cigarettes, gifts, and addresses during Christmas Truce, 1914 This isn't world war 2 but it's a great picture regardless.

The spontaneous 1914 Christmas truce during WWI remains an incredible and fascinating story

Brendan Nyhan on

The spontaneous 1914 Christmas truce during WWI remains an incredible and fascinating story

christmas truce 1914 - Google Search

The Christmas Truce 1914 : German soldiers of the Saxon Regiment photographed with men of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in No Man's Land on the Western Front.

From The Illustrated London News of January 9, 1915: "British and German Soldiers Arm-in-Arm Exchanging Headgear: A Christmas Truce between Opposing Trenches

"British and German Soldiers Arm-in-Arm Exchanging Headgear: A Christmas Truce between Opposing Trenches," taken from from the Illustrated London News of January 1915 (A. Michael - The Guardian/CC)

General Walter Congreve...WW1 Christmas truce letter found in Staffordshire

WW1 Christmas truce letter found

Sir Walter's remarkable letter revealing his reluctance to to fraternise with German soldiers during the Christmas Day truce in 1914

This touching commercial by UK supermarket chain Sainsbury's dramatizes the Christmas truce, an unofficial ceasefire that occurred at Christmastime in 1914 during World War I. The truce was instiga...

Touching Commercial for UK Supermarket Sainsbury's Dramatizes the World War I Christmas Truce of 1914

This touching commercial by UK supermarket chain Sainsbury’s dramatizes the Christmas truce, an unofficial ceasefire that occurred at Christmastime in 1914 during World War I. The truce was i…

Silent night, goalie night: Letter tells of World War One Christmas truce football match. Article from The Mirror

Silent night, goalie night: Letter tells of World War One Christmas truce football match

Staff Sergeant Clement Barker wrote the note to his brother four days after the game in saying a German messenger crossed No Man’s Land on Christmas Eve to arrange the ceasefire

World War I Christmas Truce of 1914: What Really Happened

Silent Night: The Story of the World War I Christmas Truce of 1914

World War I Christmas Truce of 1914: What Really Happened

WW1 Christmas Eve, 1914, not a shot was fired, as British and German soldiers played football and handed out drinks, cigars and souvenirs. It was possibly the most poignant moment of the Great War and for several days afterwards the two sides appeared reluctant to fire on the men they had met face to face. Will we ever learn from history the futility of war? British/German

Truce: The Day the Soldiers Stopped Fighting: Jim Murphy: Scholastic, Canada at War series