Chinese numerals - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. rod numeral place value from Yongle Encyclopedia

Chinese numerals - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. rod numeral place value from Yongle Encyclopedia

Chinese numerals are derived from the Shang dynasty oracle numerals of the 14th century BC. The oracle bone script numerals were found on tortoise shell and animal bones. In early civilizations, the Shang were able to express any numbers, however large, with 9 symbols and a counting board.

Chinese numerals are derived from the Shang dynasty oracle numerals of the 14th century BC. The oracle bone script numerals were found on tortoise shell and animal bones. In early civilizations, the Shang were able to express any numbers, however large, with 9 symbols and a counting board.

In the same way that Roman numerals were standard in ancient and medieval Europe for mathematics and commerce, the Chinese formerly used the rod numerals, which is a positional system. The Suzhou numerals (simplified Chinese: 苏州花码; traditional Chinese: 蘇州花碼; pinyin: Sūzhōu huāmǎ) system is a variation of the Southern Song rod numerals. Nowadays, the huāmǎ system is only used for displaying prices in Chinese markets or on traditional handwritten invoices.

In the same way that Roman numerals were standard in ancient and medieval Europe for mathematics and commerce, the Chinese formerly used the rod numerals, which is a positional system. The Suzhou numerals (simplified Chinese: 苏州花码; traditional Chinese: 蘇州花碼; pinyin: Sūzhōu huāmǎ) system is a variation of the Southern Song rod numerals. Nowadays, the huāmǎ system is only used for displaying prices in Chinese markets or on traditional handwritten invoices.

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Flower Pot with Barbed, Foliate Rim, probably 15th century, Numbered Jun ware: light gray stoneware with variegated purple and blue glaze; with the Chinese numeral 3 (san). China/East Asia

Flower Pot with Barbed, Foliate Rim, probably 15th century, Numbered Jun ware: light gray stoneware with variegated purple and blue glaze; with the Chinese numeral 3 (san). China/East Asia

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