(Picture    After the Gold Rush many Chinese immigrants stayed to earn more money. They worked on building the western leg of the Central Pacific Railroad.)-Originally they were gold miners during the California Gold Rush of 1849. Then they built the transcontinental railroads in 1869.Then they built the levies of California's Sacramento Valley.Then they settled down to standard shops in the cities. (J.C.)

(Picture After the Gold Rush many Chinese immigrants stayed to earn more money. They worked on building the western leg of the Central Pacific Railroad.)-Originally they were gold miners during the California Gold Rush of 1849. Then they built the transcontinental railroads in 1869.Then they built the levies of California's Sacramento Valley.Then they settled down to standard shops in the cities. (J.C.)

On May 10, 1869, the "golden spike" connects the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railroads, making transcontinental travel in the U.S. possible. Click the photo to see it placed in Google Street View.

On May 10, 1869, the "golden spike" connects the Union Pacific and Central Pacific railroads, making transcontinental travel in the U.S. possible. Click the photo to see it placed in Google Street View.

Southern Pacific Railroad advertisement from 1885. The company was founded in 1865 as a land holding company and became a railroad when it acquired the Central Pacific in 1885. The Central Pacific had employed as many as 12,000 emigrant Chinese laborers to build the railroad line from California to Utah where the "golden spike" was laid in 1869 to form the first transcontinental railroad. Utah was the connecting place with the Union Pacific railroad which had been built west from Council…

Southern Pacific Railroad advertisement from 1885. The company was founded in 1865 as a land holding company and became a railroad when it acquired the Central Pacific in 1885. The Central Pacific had employed as many as 12,000 emigrant Chinese laborers to build the railroad line from California to Utah where the "golden spike" was laid in 1869 to form the first transcontinental railroad. Utah was the connecting place with the Union Pacific railroad which had been built west from Council…

Map detail from Central Pacific Railroad Timetable,  Effective Sunday, July 9, 1871.

Map detail from Central Pacific Railroad Timetable, Effective Sunday, July 9, 1871.

The Donner Pass, possibly taken in the 1860s during the construction of the Central Pacific Railroad

The Donner Pass, possibly taken in the 1860s during the construction of the Central Pacific Railroad

Golden Spike Utah - It commemorates the completion of the first Transcontinental Railroad where the Central Pacific Railroad and the Union Pacific Railroad met on May 10, 1869. The final joining of the rails spanning the continent was signified by the driving of the ceremonial Golden Spike.

Golden Spike Utah - It commemorates the completion of the first Transcontinental Railroad where the Central Pacific Railroad and the Union Pacific Railroad met on May 10, 1869. The final joining of the rails spanning the continent was signified by the driving of the ceremonial Golden Spike.

The San Francisco Terminus of the Central Pacific Railroad in 1878. This was the new Ferry Building, completed in 1875. In addition to transcontinental passengers, thousands of workers commuted to San Francisco. From 1873 to 1877 the number of passengers increased from 2,655,671 to 5,570,555.

The San Francisco Terminus of the Central Pacific Railroad in 1878. This was the new Ferry Building, completed in 1875. In addition to transcontinental passengers, thousands of workers commuted to San Francisco. From 1873 to 1877 the number of passengers increased from 2,655,671 to 5,570,555.

First Transcontinental Railroad-also person pinned from has a lot of research on the history of railroads

First Transcontinental Railroad-also person pinned from has a lot of research on the history of railroads

April 28, 1869: Railway workers for the Central Pacific Railroad lay 10 miles of track in a single day. A horde of Irish and Chinese laborers accomplished the task, using 5 trainloads of materials, and setting a record that has not been beaten to this day. Photo is of the ceremonial "Golden Spike" driven on May 10th of the same year, celebrating the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad.

April 28, 1869: Railway workers for the Central Pacific Railroad lay 10 miles of track in a single day. A horde of Irish and Chinese laborers accomplished the task, using 5 trainloads of materials, and setting a record that has not been beaten to this day. Photo is of the ceremonial "Golden Spike" driven on May 10th of the same year, celebrating the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad.

This is John Ming working chopping wood. This was the first job he had when he was working on the Central Pacific Railroad.

This is John Ming working chopping wood. This was the first job he had when he was working on the Central Pacific Railroad.

Panorama of San Francisco from California St. Hill. (1877) | Muybridge, Eadweard, 1830-1904 Part of: Panorama of San Francisco from California St. Hill. This panorama of San Francisco comprises 11 photographs, taken over a period of several hours from the central tower of Central Pacific Railroad magnate Mark Hopkins' then unfinished Nob Hill home, located at the corner of California and Mason Streets. The mansion burned to the ground in the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Panorama of San Francisco from California St. Hill. (1877) | Muybridge, Eadweard, 1830-1904 Part of: Panorama of San Francisco from California St. Hill. This panorama of San Francisco comprises 11 photographs, taken over a period of several hours from the central tower of Central Pacific Railroad magnate Mark Hopkins' then unfinished Nob Hill home, located at the corner of California and Mason Streets. The mansion burned to the ground in the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

Lawrence & Houseworth Central Pacific Railroad construction photographs, 1866-1868  (13)    http://purl.stanford.edu/pm382dg9681

Lawrence & Houseworth Central Pacific Railroad construction photographs, 1866-1868 (13) http://purl.stanford.edu/pm382dg9681

150 Years of Great American Trains - Union Pacific 119 -  On May 10, 1869, Central Pacific Railroad chief Leland Stanford used a golden hammer to pound a single golden spike into the ground, joining the tracks of the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads in Promontory Summit, Utah. Beside Stanford were two trains -- the Central Pacific's Jupiter, and the Union Pacific's 119.

From Simple Steam to Burly Turbines: 150 Years of Great American Trains

150 Years of Great American Trains - Union Pacific 119 - On May 10, 1869, Central Pacific Railroad chief Leland Stanford used a golden hammer to pound a single golden spike into the ground, joining the tracks of the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads in Promontory Summit, Utah. Beside Stanford were two trains -- the Central Pacific's Jupiter, and the Union Pacific's 119.

Old West Central Pacific Railroad CPRR Cap Badge

Old West Central Pacific Railroad CPRR Cap Badge

Lawrence & Houseworth Central Pacific Railroad construction photographs, 1866-1868  (5)    http://purl.stanford.edu/pm382dg9681

Lawrence & Houseworth Central Pacific Railroad construction photographs, 1866-1868 (5) http://purl.stanford.edu/pm382dg9681

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